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CORRIENTES CORNER OF MAIPli 

BUENOS AIRES. 



BLVM 
ENTH 

EX A I LIB 

u /\ j us 



THE MOST PATRONISED BY THE 
BUENOS AIRES SOCIETY. 

* 

By far the Best Cinematograph Pictures 
in the Republic. 

-?- 
HIGHLY MORAL. 

?- 

Purchase, Sale, and Hire of Cinematograph Films. 





THE NOTED HOUSE FOR 

PARASOLS, FANS, STICKS, UMBRELLAS, 

POCKET LETTER=CASES, SMOKER'S 

OUTFITS, etc., etc. 



THE LATEST PARISIAN NOVELTIES RECEIVED 
EVERY FORTNIGHT. 



Special Workshop for all kinds of Repairs 

Florida, 98 Z. Buenos Aires 



Union Telefonica: 2428 A V EN I DA. 

\ APSFN'S . Bonks and Magazines 



WALKER'S Loose leaf 

POCKET-BOOKS 





LETTERETTES: 

The Handiest Form of Stationery Extant. 
Envelope and Note- Paper in One. 

HANDY. STYLISH. USEFUL. 



=* 

For 

HOME, 
OFFICE, 

or 
TRAVEL. 



OPEN 




CLOSED 



Can always be obtained at MITCHELL'S STORES, 

578, Cangallo, 580, Buenos Aires. 



MITCHELL'S STANDARD GUIDE 
TO 

BUENOS AIRES. 



ALDAO & DEL VALLE, 

Lawyers. 

Administrative, Financial and Judicial Matters. 
LETTERS PATENT & TRADE MARKS. 

Head Office : 

20 CALLE RECONQUISTA, BUENOS AIRES. 

Kosario Office: 
ALDAO, CAMPOS & CORREA, 890 LAPRIDA. 

London Office : 

ALDAO, CAMPOS & ALDAO, 
602 SALISBURY HOUSE, FINSBURY CIRCUS, E.G. 

REFERENCES IN LONDON: 

LEGATION OF THE AKEGXTINR REPUBLIC, 2 PALACE GATE, W. 
THE LONDON AND RIVER PLATE HANK, LTD., 7 PRINCES STREET, E.C. 

'LE FIVE O'CLOCK' 

FLORIDA, 76, ., BUENOS AIRES. 




THK 15EST RKCOMMKNDKI) ESTABLISHMENT FOR 
LUNCHEONS AND TEAS. 

-* 

LUXURIOUS SALOONS FOR FAMILIES 

-5- 

UNDER SCRUPULOUS MANAGEMENT. 



MITCHELL'S : ; 
STANDARD GUIDE 



TO 



BUENOS AIRES 

With 

Spanish Phrases for Travellers, 

Giving Correct Pronunciation 
of each Word, 




BUENOS AIRES: 

MITCEIELL'S BOOK STORE, 580 CANV.ALLO 1578. 

3f^ 

LONDON : 
T. WERNER LAURIE, CLIFFORD'S INN, TEMPLE BAR, E.G. 

Entered at Stationers' Hall, 




Casa 
Renacimiento 

361 Florida 363, 

Buenos Aires. 



WORKS OF ART. 



BRONZES, MARBLES, 
ARTISTIC POTTERY. 

USEFUL AND ARTISTIC 
PRESENTS. 



ENGLISH SPOKEN. 



Picture Gallery: 



. Four Exhibiiions during 
the year. 



URL 



INTRODUCTION. 



HAVING been repeatedly asked for a Guide to the City 
of Buenos Aires, with a correct and comprehensive 
Map, the publisher has replied by putting this book before 
the public. To deal separately with its features it only 
need be said that the 

Spanish Conversational Phrases do not pretend 
to convey anything like a full knowledge of the Spanish 
language, but merely to supply the conversational needs 
of the new arrival. Should he be only on a short visit 
they will answer most of his requirements On the other 
hand, should he intend making a long stay, they will 
answer the purpose of assisting him until such time 
as he makes other arrangements for acquiring the lan- 
guage. For this reason the phrases deal with every 
situation in which the new arrival is likely to find himself 
within the first few days. 

The Illustrations are in every case original and 
accurate. 

The Compilation has been so arranged for as to ensure 
its absolute accuracy. 

Railway Information, and that concerning postal and 
telegraphic regulations, municipal and other statistics, &c , 

5 



GUIDE TO BUKNOS AIRES. 

have in every case been obtained direct from their respective 
official sources. 

Historical Data have been culled from wroHcs of proved 
reliability, and, in short, no pains have been spared by the 
publisher to put on the market an unambitious but useful 
book, well calculated to fill its mission of being ' guidi-,' 
mentor, and friend to the new arrival. 

THK i'UJl.lSHKK. 

Mitchells Bool; Stores, 

fin a i ox .lira. 



/'or the matter regarding Emigrants and Emigration u\ ar, in i, .'/,>/ 
^V to the Emigrant? Information Oflin-. 31 
r. London, .V. //'. 



FELIPE FURST. 

Grand Gold Medal and C) BUENOS AIRES 

Highest Award T 

at the Calle Florida, 3O. 



(KsUiblished in 1889). 



National Exhibition 
1898. 

Large Assortment of FT I ]J WT M A V I T U" A ( "TO 11 V IV 

WALKING STICKS & ' 
UMBRELLAS WITH 
GOLD, SILVER AND 
FANCY HANDLES. 



SOUTH AMERICA OF 

PIPES. 



Specialities in Pocket 
Letter Ca> ^. 

KK\L MKKKSCIiAl'M 4- AMI'-KR 

k CIGAR & CIGARETTE HOLDERS. 

ALL KINDS OF REPAIRS DONE. 

6 




Partial View of Buenos Aires. 



[f'/iofo : A.W. K. & Co. 



'LA ARGENTINA.' 



Antonio F, Garcia 

FURRIER. 

SPECIALITY IN 
PARAGUAYAN LACE. 



FUR GARMENTS OF EVERY 

DESCRIPTION MADE 

TO ORDER. 



Seal, Tiger, Puma, and other 
varieties of Argentine Skins 
always in stock. 

INDIAN CURIOSITIES. 



ARMADILLO BASKETS. 
Calle Cuyo,436 Butnos Aires 



P. NASUTE BROS. 

LADIES' TAILORS 

{Costumes a Speciality), 

BESPOKE TAILORS. 



DRESSES FOR THE THEATRE. 
RIDING HABITS. 



BUENOS AIRES : 

222 Suipacha 222 

BKTWKEN CANOALI.O AND CUYO 
(U. Tclcf. 2319 Libert ad). 

BRANCH HOUSE: 

Mar del Plata, San Martin 

CORNER OK BUENOS AIRES 
CASINO DEL BRISTOL. 



MELIAN 

AND 

PAMPA, 
Belgrano 




THK XKW S\VIMMIX<; 1!A III. 



Day and 

Boarding School 

for both Sexes. 




YEAR BEGINS FEBRUARY, 1910. 
Enrolment Daily, 9 ' '" to noon. 

Early application is necessary from intending hoarders. The accommodation 
has l>een greatly extended by the new house for 1-oys, expressly built for 
them, with all modern conveniences. 

For particulars of Stiiff, i&V., see page 142. 



INDEX. 



Argentine Words and Phrases 

Auction Marts, Cattle 

Buenos Aires, The City of 

British Representatives 

Bolsa, The 

Cathedral, The 

Cemeteries 

How to find your way 

Lezama Park 

Population 

Tramway Service 

Zoological Gardens 

Clubs 

Churches 

Protestant 

Roman Catholic 

Cab and Automobile Tariffs ... 

Dispatching Agencies 

Dogs 

Estancias, Argentine 

Emigration, British 

Facts and Figures, A few 
Interesting 

Cable Companies 

City, The 

Exports 

Geographical Position 

Live-stock 

Port, The ..^ 

Plaza Victoria 

Railways 

Freemasonry 

Golf 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Hospital Service 

Miscellaneous 

Baths Markcis Open Spaces 

Libraries 

Labour, Scope for 

Money : Rates of Exchange, &c. 

Newspapers, English 

Places to Visit 

Postal Information ... . 
Public Offices, &c 



I'AGK ' 1'ACE 

152 Rowing ioi 

53 Railways 

n Buenos Aires and Pacific 135 

128 i Buenos Aires Midland 140 

54 i Buenos Aires Western 136 

56 i C6rdoba, Central 137 

58 Entre Rios 139 

13 Central Argentine 129 

56 Great Southern 133 

14 Societies and Institutions 

17 British and American Benevolent 

59 Society 69 

41 British Hospital 82 

Children's Home 149 

47 Choral Union 86 

50 English Literary Society 88 

50 Irish Orphanage for Girls ... 89 

51 League of the Empire 66 

63 Missions to Seamen Institute... 88 

54 North American Society 77 

123 Salvation Army 71 

St. Andrew's Society 76 

Sailors' Home and Harbour 

38 Mission 78 

33 Women's Exchange 89 

38 , Young Men's Christian 

32 j Association T\ 

39 Young Women's Christian 

37 Association 150 

36 Sports and Athletics 

30 Belgrano Athletic Club 91 

46 Hurlinglinm Club 92 

97 San Isidro Athletic Club 96 

I0 5 Suburbs, The 106 

102 Banfield 109 

Flores and Eloresta ... no 

Lomas 108 

(Juilmes no 

Schools 141-149 

Theatres, &c 26 

Visitors' Directory 151 

Useful Hints 61 

Weights and Measures 23 

Yachting 98-100 



112 

52 

22 

121 

"3 

8-22 

42 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGfi 

PARTIAL VIEW OK BUENOS AIRES .. " ... 9 

A LADY OK BUENOS AIRES IN HER WALKING DRESS, 1840 ... 16 

I'LAZA DE MAYO 19 

AVEXIDA DE MAYO 25, 29 

THE FIRST SETTLEMENT AT BUENOS AIRES ATTACKED BY THE 

INDIANS IN 1535 ... 27 

STOCK EXCHANC.E (LA BOLSA) ... 35 

PLAZA VICTORIA ... ..- . ,.. 45 

ESCUELA NAVAL MILITAR ... 55 

PI.AZA LAVALI.E'... .... ... ... * ... ... 65 

PASEO-RECOLETA ... ... .. ... ... .... . ... 75 

TIGRE BOAT CLUB ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 79 

JOCKEY CLUB ... 85 

TIGRE HOTEL, TIGRE ... '95 

ROCKING STONE, TANDIL "... 103 

PALERMO PARK 109, 135 

ENTRANCE TO GOVERNMENT HOUSE in 

CAMP RANCH, ARGENTINE REPUBLIC ... 125 

PLAZA CONSTITUCION, SHOWING THE OLD SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

STATION 139 

LA GALERA, ARGENTINA 145 

ALTO PARANA, ARGENTINE REPUBLIC ... ... .. ... 155 

SUNDAY OUT, ARGENTINE CAMP ... 159 

SIERRAS DE COR DOHA (CORDOBA HILLS) 165 

ARGENTINE GAUCHO WITH GUITAR ... ... ... ... ... 169 

GAUCHO 171 

GOING TO MARKET, BUENOS AIRES 175 

10 



STANDARD GUIDE 

TO 

BUENOS AIRES. 



THE CITY OF BUENOS AIRES. 

On first arriving in Buenos Aires^ many a visitor, relying 
upon knowledge gained by the perusal of ancient, out of 
date, or fictitious literary matter, .is surprised to find that 
Buenos Aires is a city, a really great city, and not a 
picturesque collection of wooden shanties, backed by a 
prairie and inhabited by a population of half-civilised 
' gauchos,' mounted on rough-coated ponies and armed to 
the teeth. 

It is as well to dispel this illusion at once by stating that 
Buenos Aires is one of the largest cities in the world ; the 
largest of all in South America and undoubtedly the most 
important and the most modern and progressive in the 
whole continent. Larger in area than Paris, Berlin, or 
Vienna, the ' Paris of the South,' as Buenos Aires has 
been by no means unaptly nicknamed, is possessed of 
every possible improvement and convenience that modern 
ingenuity has devised. In fact, the resident of Buenos 
Aires would be far more surprised to hear of any modern 
improvement his city does not possess than the newcomer 
to see the many that it doss. 

Buenos Aires was founded as a city in 1535, but it s 
only during the last half-century that her progress has been 
so phenomenal as -to attract world-wide attention. 

ii 



GRAND HOTEL, 

Florida, 25, Buenos Aires. 




Under the personal supervision of the 
proprietor, 

F. ANSERMIN. 

Strictly First Class. 

ALL OUR STAFF SPEAK ENGLISH 

Telegrams: (irandhotel. 
12 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

In a city such as Buenos Aires, where much depends 
upon the season and even more on the statistics relating to 
immigration, it is not possible to give any precise figure as 
to the amount of population. It may be put down roughly 
at one and a quarter million inhabitants, and a very large 
percentage could be described as floating population, spend- 
ing part of their time in the city and part in the camp, as 
the country districts are generally referred to. Also, the 
population varies to the extent of very many thousands, 
according to whether the shipping is brisk or dull. The 
town is divided into twenty parishes and police districts, 
and protection is provided by thirty-eight auxiliary police- 
stations ('comisarias') besides the Central Police Department 
in Calle Moreno. On the whole the police force is con- 
scientious and efficient, although somewhat scanty for a 
city of such importance. In all cases of complaint the 
stranger can depend upon courtesy and civility, more 
especially on the part of the superior officials. He will, 
however, not so easily find promptness and dispatch, but 
the visitor may as well make up his mind from the moment 
of landing to philosophically practise the virtue of patience 
when dealing with any class of officials whatsoever. 

How to Find Your Way. 

The arrangement of the streets is such that, when the 
new arrival learns to bear a few facts in mind regarding 
construction, he can find his way about with a minimum of 
inconvenience. The town is entirely bisected by a long, 
and, in places, broad thoroughfare, named Calle Rivadavia. 

Starting from dock No. 3, this street runs through the 
whole town, and every street placed at right angles to it 
starts its numbers there. Thus, walking up Calle Rivadavia 
and keeping his back to the river, the pedestrian will find 
that the first house in each street he passes is marked No. i 
on the one side and No. 3, on the other, this rule of 
numbering odd numbers and even numbers on opposite 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

sides being preserved without exception. The streets are 
divided into blocks of fifty numbers per side. Thus, it 
stands to reason that any given number may be located by 
a moment's thought. The No. 580, for instance, in 
Calle Cangallo, is on an exact level with No. 580 in Calle 
Bartolome Mitre, Cuyo, or any of the other streets running 
parallel with that thoroughfare. At any corner of Cangallo, 
the visitor will see by the number-plates of the houses of 
all streets running at right angles that he is at the end 
Sf the .second block, the houses show 199 at one side and 
on the other. By that he knows at once that he is 
K 'ocks or squares from Calle Rivadavia, the city's 



... ..ou with this publication is printed 
with me i.i.j i where the City is entered from the 
docks at the FOOT, which is usually occupied by the 
South. This is done to place the plan of the City before 
the traveller as the City itself is when he lands from the 
steamer. 

Population. 

To be exact, the census of the Republic, taken on the 
3ist December, 1908, showed the population of 6,484,023. 
Of this total the capital was credited with 1,184,252, and 
the Province of Buenos Aires with 1,647,029. The figures, 
however, although official, cannot be taken as exact, owing 
to the difficulties explained in previous paragraph. 

Progress of the Capital. 

At the present time there are in Buenos Aires 10,349 
factories and workshops, representing a capital of 
^23,470,446. They are worked by mechanical motive 
power, amounting to 105,575 h.p , and give employment 
to nearly 120,000 hands. In 1908 they turned out manu- 
factured articles to the value of ^50,674,925, and even this 

14 

\ 



R.M.8.P. 



THE ROYAL MAIL . . 
STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 

(Royal Charter, dated 1839,1 

Am 



LUXURIOUS TRAVEL IN LARGE 
NEW TWIN-SCREW STEAMERS TO 

BRAZIL & BUENOS AIRES 

Via SPAIN, PORTUGAL and MADEIRA. 

tfK 

FREQUh-.v 

SOUTHAMPTON AND 



Special Yachting: Cruises 

To 

THE WEST INDIES, v I 

January to April. 



Cruises every Fortnight to 



CANARY ISLANDS 

and MADEIRA< 



Apply THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

LONDON : 18 MOORGATE STREET, E.G., AND 
32 KTocKSPUR STRERT, S.W. 




A LADY OF BUENOS AIRES 
in her Walking Dress, 1840. 

1 6 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

huge sum probably falls far short of the actual value, as an 
exact check upon the output is a matter of impossibility. 
In 1897 buildings were erected in Buenos Aires to the value 
of ^"2,060,130, whereas in 1908 the value of the new 
buildings put up was reckoned at ^9,500,000, truly a 
remarkable proof of the city's advancement. In twelve 
years the total amount of the buildings constructed has 
equalled ^28,000,000. 

Tramway Service. 

The city's tramway service claims to be the most perfect 
in existence. Throughout the entire central portion of the 
town there is a line of electric tramways in every street with 
the exception of the Avenida de Mayo and Calle Florida. 
The narrowness of the streets already referred to forbids the 
existence of a double line except in such wide thoroughfares 
as the Paseo de Julio, the Paseo Colon, the Avenida 
Alvear, and various portions of such streets as Calles Las 
Heras, Rivadavia, Cordoba, Almirante Brown, &c., and in 
the various suburbs. For instance, car No. 9, running 
from Retire, makes its way up Calle Reconquista, but 
returns via the next street, Calle San Martin. To ascertain 
the various routes traversed by the different numbered cars 
the visitor cannot do better than purchase one of the ten 
cents tramway guide-books, on sale in any part of the 
town. 



5 cents 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

POSTAL INFORMATION. 

POSTAL TARIFF CITY AND INLAND. 
Letters, per 15 grammes weight or part thereof 
Newspapers, Reviews or periodicals, each 60 

grammes ... 

Other printed matter, each 100 grammes 
Samples (without value) first 100 grammes ... 

and for each succeeding 50 grammes 
Business papers, each 100 grammes (or part)... 
Registered letters (in addition to the ordinary fee) 12 ,, 
(Continued on p. 22). 

LONDRES HOTEL and 
RESTAURANT 'LA SON AM BU LA. 




N. CANALE BROS., PLAZA DE MAYO, BUENOS AIRES. 
English Spoken. 

TELEPHONES : UNION 48 (AVENIDA); COOPERATIVA 4113 (CENTRAL). 

18 








Plaza de Mayo, City of Buenos Aires, \rhoto: A.M:B.S>CO. 



Model Jur Stores 



JUAN WENCELBLAT & SONS 

CUYO, 640, 

Branch of G. Pelligrini 779 
. . BUENOS AIRES . . 



'SPECIALITIES : 
COATS, 
MANTLES, 
STOLES, 
TIPPETS, 

AND SUPERIOR 

FUR MUFFS. 



OUTFITTING 

A 

SPECIALITY. 

FURS TAKEN CHARGE 

OK DURING THE 

SUMMER. 



Large assortment of 

PARAGUAYAN LACE. 



EVERY DESCRIPTION OF SKINS CUKEP. 
SPECIAL TRADE IN 

GUANACO AND VICUNA RUGS. 



FOR 

EMBROIDERY, 
POKER WORK, 

WOOLS, and other 
Articles appertaining to 
same, 

Do not fail to visit the 
Store of 

J. L. CLAESSEN&Co. 

CANGALLO, 868 

BUENOS AIRE5. 



.'W.Jiuntington 

531, Cuyo, 531, 

Buenos Aires. 

'Traductor Publico Nacional.' 

Special attention to Translations in 
volving unusual technical difficulties. 

Alexander Murray & Son 

Tailors. 

SPECIALISTS IN 
RIDING BREECHES. 



CUYO, 513, BUENOS AIRES. 



American Dentist. 



Union Tel. : 
3180 AVKNIUA. 



Florida, 509, 

Buenos Aires. 



Adolfo Voelkcr 

Practical Gunsmith. 

Specialists in high-class and intricate work in 

all branches of the trade. 

HKJHKST DECRKK of WORKMANSHIP 

Representative to T. P. SAUKR and 

SOHN SI* HI. (Cermany). 

San Martin, 379, Buenos Aires. 



'LA AMERICA' 

fcmttei: anfc Sbirt 



CKNTI.KMKNS OUTFITS 

A SPECIALITY. 
Latest Novelties in all the Detriments. 

E. C. DE GRATTAROLA 

Calle Cuyo, 701, & Maipu, 3O2, 

Buenos Aires. 



'LA ESPECIAL' 

KAKKICA DK SKLLOS I>K <;<MA. 
TALLKK UE (JRAHADO. 



J. B. BARES, 

861, CORRIENTES, 861, 

(Krcnte It la Opera) 

BUENOS AIRES. 



EXQUISITE SALOON, 

218, Esmeralda, 226. 

BAR AND RESTAURANT 

A LA CARTE. 

Ladies' Saloon. Strictly ftnt-ctan Family 

Restaurant. Finest ( 'uisine X: Wines. 

MARTIN OATTI, 

F.\ - Manager (Irand Hotel, l!ui-n,,s Ail.-. 

H. GUERIN, Clover, 

169, CALLE PERU, 169, 
BUENOS AIRES. 




Special trade in Imported Gloves. 

WHOI.1". M.|. ,\M> RHIMI. 



Bar & Restaurant 

' MODERNO 

CALLE MAIPU, 130O. 

(Facing Ketiro Railway Stn). 

MKALS SKRVKI) A LA CAHTK. 
SALOON FOR FA MI I.IKS. 

Proprietor ANTHELME MOLLARD 
l^iteof theC.ifc ' Aleyria.' 

JEWELLER & WATCH AND 
CLOCK MAKER. 

IMI'ORTKK OF ' BRITANICOs' \\ATUII.S. 

Choice Selection of Cenuine Jewellery 

always in Sttx;k. 

ARTURO DE LA PENA, 
Cangallo, 874, Buenot Aires. 



tyfiotograp&ie 
St ore. 



KODAKS. 

Films, 

Plates, ~ f 

Paper, ^f ^> Representative 



for 

|^ Taylor, Taylor 
^ & Hobson, 

Leicester, 

for 

CQOKE'S LENSES. 
English Spoken. 



'LA 
NACIONAL.' 



CASIMIRO GOMEZ 

Callc Bernardo de Irigoyen 
143 = 165. 

(Formerly Calle Buen Orden.) 
Buenos Aires. 



SADDLERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

Large Assortment of Travelling 
Requisites. 

'VULCAN' TRUNKS 

THE STRONGEST &* MOST HANDY 
FOR TRAVELLERS. 



ntending purchasers should inspect our 
permanent display. 



THE GARDEN 
HOTEL, 

950, CALLAO 950, 
BUENOS AIRES. 

(Facing Plaza Rodriguez Pena.) 



The Best Situated Hotel in the City. 

LARGE GARDEN. 

Well ventilated Rooms with all the 

windows overlooking the thoroughfare 

or Garden. 

HIGH -CLASS CUISINE. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS. 

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION 
FOR FAMILIES. 

English spoken. On parle Francais. 

COHEN & MURRAY, 

UNION TELEPHONE 10 Proprietors. 

(JUNCAI.). 

ENRICO 
FELCHER 



dealer in 
Old Modern 
Works of 3irt 



Carlos Pellegrini, 678, 
Buenos Aires. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

POSTAL INFORMATION (Continued 'from /. iS.) 
City and Inland. 

Postcards ... ... ... ... ... 4 

Letter-cards ... ... ... ... ... 5 ,, 

Parcel Post: Parcels up to i kilo 0.50 

,, from i to 2 kilos ... ... ... o.oo 

2 3 ... ... 080 

,, 3 5 ... ... $1.00 

Telegrams (Inland): For the first ten words 5 cents, each, 

and each succeeding word 3 cents. 
Telegrams (City) : For the first ten words 2\ cents, each, 

and each succeeding word i cents. 

Telegrams marked urgent or written in a foreign language 
are charged double, and in code, quadruple. 

Foreign. 

Letters per 15 grammes weight or part thereof ... 12 cents. 
Postcards ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Newspapers and other printed matter per 50 

grammes ... 3 

Registered letters (extra)... ... ... ... 12 

Letters for Brazil. Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and 
Bolivia, per 15 grammes weight or part 
thereof ... ... ... ... ... 10 

MONEY. 

RATIS OF EXCHANGK, &c. 

At the ordinary rate of exchange $11.45 Argentine 
paper money is equivalent to the English sovereign, or in 
Argentine gold the English pound sterling is worth 5.04. 
The eagle of ten dollars (United States) equals 10.364 
Argentine gold. 

The rate of conversion from Argentine paper into 
Argentine gold is 227.27 (paper) to -^loo (gold). 

The value of the current paper dollar may be reckoned 
approximately at is. 8</. English money or 40 cents. 
American, 

22 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

For the convenience of travellers going from Buenos 
Aires to Montevideo or vice versa, it is well to mention that 
$1000 Argentine gold equal '$932.84 Uruguayan gold, 
whereas icoo Uruguayan gold equal $1072 Argentine gold. 

Visitors to Buenos Aires are strongly advised to transact 
all financial business and money exchanging at one of the 
Banks, in preference to patronising the small money- 
changing shops where rates of exchange do not rule so high, 
nevertheless there is the Exchange Office of Serior Vaccaro 
at 156 Florida, where you can exchange your money at best 
rates current. We thoroughly recommend this house. 

Principal Banks in Buenos Aires. 

London and River Plate Bank, Bartolome Mitre, 399. 
British Bank of South America, Bartolome Mitre 400. 
London & Brazilian Bank, Bartolome Mitre 402. 
Banco de la Nacion Argentina, Rivadavia 367. 
Anglo South American Bank (late Tarapaca), Recon- 

quista 78. 

Italia y Rio de la Plata, Bartolome Mitre 434. 
Banco Germanico, Reconquista 29. 
Banco Espanol del Rio de la Plata, Cangallo 400. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

The following is a table of weights and measures : 

i kilogram ... ... ... 2.2046 Ibs. avoirdupois 

looc kilograms ... ... about i ton. 

i kilometre ... ... 0.62138 milf 

i 'square' ... ... ... about 4 acres, 

i hectare ... ... ... 2.471 acres. 

i litre ... ... ... 0.22 gallon. 

i hectolitre ... ... 22 gallons. 

i 'quintal'... ... ... 46 kilos=ioi Ibs. 

i ' arroba' ... ... ... 25 Ibs. 

j bushel ... ... ... 55 Ibs. = 25 kilos. 

2 3 



$rand Safe and 35 ar, 
Jtrmonia! 



AVENIDA DE MAYO, 1002 1018, 
BUENOS AIRES. 



This Establishment, which is situated in the 
very centre of the grand Avenida de Mayo, 
is the most patronised and well known in 
South America. 



ORCHESTRA EVERY DAY. 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT. 



Light Meals served Best Attention paid 

=^! 

at all hours. to Patrons. 



Proprietors: CAN EDA BROS. 




Avenida de Mayo: Buenos Aires. 



\Photo: A . 




FOR 



PIANO5 
MU5IC 



AND 



VISIT THE 

OLD & RELIABLE FIRM 

OF 

J. M. BANA & CO., 

RIVADAVIA, 853 
BUENOS AIRES 



Pianos Sold upon Cash or Time 
Payments, also Rented. 

25 



C.UIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



PLACES OF AMUSEMENT -THEATRES, &c. 

In the way of places of amusement Buenos Aires 
possesses a splendid selection of theatres, where some of 
the very finest artistic talent in the world is to be seen. 
Especially is this the case with operatic companies, of which 
a large number visit South America every year. Essentially 
musical by nature, the Argentine will not tolerate medi- 
ocrity in musical or operatic performances, and the result is 
that at the principal theatres a galaxy of talent is assembled 
during the opera season that would do credit to any 
European capital. Many good dramatic companies also 
visit Buenos Aires, but on the other hand variety entertain- 
ments are remarkably few and for the most part by no 
means good. The principal music-hall is the Casino in 
Calle Maipii : a good programme is occasionally to be 
witnessed here ; but at all times it is undesirable to take a 
lady there, and even less so to any of the other musioha'ls. 

Of the theatres, the most magnificent of all is the new 
Municipal Theatre, the Colon. Only completed in 1908, 
this imposing building occupies a whole square in the Plaza 
Lavalle and is one of the finest theatres in the world ; its 
erection cost more than half a million sterling, and more 
than nine years were required to complete it. The per- 
formances given here are always of a very high-class nature 
consisting principally of grand opera. Entrances are in the 
Calles Libertad, Tucuman, Viamonte, and the Plaxa 
Lavalle. 

The Opera House is another very fine theatre, being 
beautifully fitted and decorated, though thp building itself, 
wedged in among shops and houses, is not by- any means 
imposing. Here again, the visitor can rely upon good fare 
being served up for his delectation. The address is Calle 
Corrientes 860. 




The first Settlement at Buenos Aires attacked by the Indians in 1535. 



Oth<>r much-patronised Theatres are : 

Teatro Odeon, Esmeralda 367. 

San Martin, Esmeralda 257. 

Politeama, Corrientes 1479 an d 1491. 
Coliseo Argentine, Charcas 1109-1149. 
Teatro de la Avenida, Avenida de Mayo 1218. 

de Mayo, Avenida de Mayo 1099. 

,, Apolo, Corrientes 1386. 

,, Marconi, Rivadavia 2328. 

,, de la Comedia, Carlos Pellegrini 248. 

,, Libertad, Ecuador 577. 
Victoria, Victoria 1390. 
27 



THE CHESTER HOTEL 



M 
c 

'a 
a 

o 



r w 




AVENIDA DE MAYO, 586, BUENOS AIRES. 

The English Hotel of Buenos Aires. 



NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR BATHS, LIGHT, OR ATTENDANCE. 
ELECTRIC LIFT AND AM. MODERN CONVENIENCES. 

Proprietors CHESTER & CO, 

2? 




Avenida de Mayo, Buenos Aires. 



DION BOUTON 

AUTOMOBILS 

Are the most Elegant, simple and 
well built. 



Only Winner for Speed from Buenos Aires to Bahia 
Blanca and from Buenos Aires to Cordoba. 



Sole Representative 
J. CAS SOU LET, Esmeralda, 432, BUENOS AIRES. 

UNION TELEK. : 1938 AVENIDA. 
29 



GUI HE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

A FEW INTERESTING FACTS AND 
FIGURES. 

In a little work of this description it is not proposed to 
tire the mind of the reader by quoting a lot of official 
figures which, interesting as they may be to the statistician, 
convey little or no meaning to the general public. At the 
same time, it is impossible for the visitor to understand' the 
ntisoti d'etre of a city of such importance and luxury as 
Buenos Aires unless it be fully realised that it is the main 
entrance of the imports and principal outlet for the exports 
of the Republic, and no idea as to the importance of the 
country in the commercial scale can be gathered without 
the aid of a few figures. 



Railways. 

The railway system of Argentina possesses a peculiar 
point of interest to the English visitor, for it is almost 
entirely due to British capital that the network of railways 
which now connects all points of the Republic was origin- 
ally brought about. Whoever may entertain the slightest 
doubt as to the Republic's triumph and march along the 
road of progress must at once have all such doubts dis- 
pelled by even a casual glance at the official railway figures. 
The total amount in metres of railway track completed, or 
in the course of construction, on December 23rd, 1908, was 
23,722,600, showing an increase over the year 1907 of 
1597 kilometres 100 metres. This means to say, that in 
that year railway lines in the country were pushed forward 
at the phenomenal rate of 4^ kilometres every day. The 
total cost of railway construction in the Republic up to 
December 3ist, 1908, was reckoned at ^1,41 1,457. The 

3 



Optical and Photographic Institute, 

ANNEXED TO THE 'DROGUERIA UE LA KSFRELLA,' LTD. 

435, Alsina, 455, Buenos Aires. 

Photographic Equipments for Tourists. 

Kodak, Gaumont, Bellieni, and other Cameras. 

Plates, Drugs, Films, and Printing Papers 

of the highest standard. 

Stereoscope Views of the Republic. 

Marine, Field, & Opera Glasses by Zeiss & Goerz. 

Crown Glass. 
Lenses and Spectacles. 



English, French, German, 
and Italian spoken. 





mileage of some of the principal railways in March, 1909, 
was as follows : 

Great Southern Railway ... ... ... 2740 

Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway ... 2494 

Central Argentine Railway ... ... 2390 

Buenos Aires Western Railway ... ... 1305 

The respective capital of these four railways to date is 
Great Southern Railway ... ... ^33,300,000 

Pacific Railway ... ... ... 15,450,000 

Central Argentine Railway ... 32,188,141 

Western Railway ... .. ... 17,020,805 

Argentine Wheat. 

Firstly, as a wheat-producing country, Argentina ranks 
sixth in the world, only being beaten by the United States, 
Russia, France, India, Austria and Hungary. The crop 



GUI1)E TO BUENOS AIRES. 

for the present year (1909) is calculated to reach 5,162,000 
tons, and on December 3151 last (1908) the various Rail 
ways, by order of the Government, had sufficient rolling- 
stock on the line to ensure the transport of 1,065,000 
tons of grain monthly, the tonnage being distributed as 

follows : 

TONS. 

Southern Railway ... .... ... ... ... 235,000 

Western Railway ... ... ... ... ... 167,000 

B. A. and Rosario Railway ... ... ... 142,000 

Central Argentine Railway ... ... ., 135,000 

Pacific Railway ... ... ... ... ... 157,000 

Argentine Great Western Railway ... ... 60,000 

Andino Railway ... ... ... ... ... 19,000 

Central Northern Railway ... ... ... 30,000 

Province of Santa Fe Railway ... ... ... 67,000 

Central North Eastern Railway ... ... ... 35,000 

Cordoba and Rosario Railway ... ... ... 18,000 

1,065,000 

The above quantities do not refer only to wheat, but also 
include linseed, maize, and oats. The total cereal crop for 
1909 is calculated to aggregate 15,494,000 tons. 

Geographical Position, &c. 

Buenos Aires is geographically placed at Lat. S. 34 36' 
and Long. W. 50 21', the distance from Southampton being 
6471 miles. The time is 3 hours 53 minutes 21 seconds 
behind Greenwich mean time. Geographically and cli- 
matically the city, and, for that matter, most of the entire 
province of Buenos Aires, is so advantageously situated 
that, both from an agricultural and commercial point of 
view, its advancement, rapid as it has been, is perfectly 
natural and easy to be understood The climate, although 
warmer than that prevailing in England, is seldom of such 

32 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

tropical heat as to be insupportable. The terrible droughts 
-suffered by the northern provinces at times, and the cruel 
frosts of the extreme south, are unknown quantities in this 
favoured region, and although something like torrential 
downpours of rain are experienced in the rainy season, these 
seldom last long enough to cause anything more serious 
than inconvenience, or at the worst, slight damage. Topo- 
graphically, the province is flat, and in a scenic sense 
somewhat monotonous and uninteresting. This same 
flatness, however, has been a great advantage in 
facilitating road transport, and railway construction has 
been a very valuable asset to the Republic itself. 

The City. 

As an object of beauty, the city of Buenos Aires is 
severely handicapped by one circumstance that is invariably 
noticed by the new arrival. This is, that for the most part 
the streets are exceedingly narrow, contrary to general 
belief. They were not so constructed for the purpose of 
economising space, but so that, in the hot season, one side 
at least would be shady excepting for the time that the 
sun is at its zenith. However, no matter what the 
reason, there is no denying the fact that much of the 
architectural beauty of the buildings is lost on account 
of the coup d'ceil being so very limited. At times one is 
struck by the magnificent appearance of a corner building, 
which by reason of its position commands attention. It is 
only then that one notices that whole rows of buildings on 
either side of it are equal, or nearly so, in point of beauty, 
but the narrowness of the street up which he has passed 
had prevented the visitor from noticing this fact before. 
Undoubtedly the finest thoroughfare in the city is the Avenida 
de Mayo (see illustration, page 29), nearly a mile and a-half 
long, perfectly straight, and some forty yards wide. This splen- 
did street starts at the Plaza 25 de Mayo (also called Plaza 

33 c 



Buenos Aires 
Great Southern Railway 

WORKING 2740 MILES OF LINE. 
General Manager - - J. PERCY CLARKE, M.Inst.C.E. 




PLAZA CONSTITUCION STATION. 

(See illustration of old Station, page 139.) 

The Great Southern Railway serves the greater part of the Province of 
Buenos Aires, and the main portion of the system lies tetween the Ports of 
Buenos Aires and La Plata and Bahia Blanca. The Company possesses 
extensive shipping accommodation at the latter place, with moles and elevators- 
equipped with modern appliances for dealing with large quantities of grain. 
Beyond Bahia Blanca the Railway runs across the Pampa Central and Rio 
Negro Territories to Nenquen, from whence an Extension to the Chilian 
frontier has l>een sanctioned by Congress. 

PLACES OF INTEREST. 

Amongst places of interest on the line may be mentioned Tandil. with its 
famous rocking-stone (see illustration, page 103), and the fashionable watering- 
places of the Argentine Republic ; Mar del Plata, to which a special service of 
night trains and express day trains with Pullman cars is run. To the latter 
place the bookings last season were nearly 25,000. At La Plata, the provincial 
capital, there are many fine buildings, and a museum which has acquired an 
international reputation. The Company is now undertaking an important Exten- 
sion programme comprising about 1 500 kilometres say, 930 miles of new lines. 

City Office: 568 CALLE CANCALLO 
BCENOS ArRKs, May 1909. (tvlttrt full infer nmticH can l<e obtained). 

34 




Stock Exchange (La Bolsa) Buenos Aires. \Pkoto: H.G.oids. 



VICTOR TEfl 

456, CANGALLO, 460. 




ENGLISH BREAKFASTS. PORRIDGE AND CREAM. 

LUNCHEONS. 
AFTERNOON TEAS. 

English Cakes and Pastries, Wedding 1 , Christening 1 , and 
Birthday Cakes a Speciality. 

PRIVATE ROOM FOR LADIES. 

35 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Mayo and Plaza Victoria), and extends right along to the 
great pile of the new Congress House, now in course of 
erection. 

Plaza Victoria (see illustration, page 45). 

Buenos Aires' principal square or plaza is a splendid 
open space, tastefully laid out with flowerbeds, turf patches, 
&C., and adorned with fountains and statues. 

The most conspicuous building in the Plaza, as also the 
most important, is Government House (see illustration, 
page m\ situated in the most prominent part of the Plaza 
Victoria, is built of red brick and sandstone, and extends 
the entire length of the bottom of the square. The back 
of the building gives on to the Plaza Colon, which, being at 
a lower level than the Plaza Victoria, adds a story to it. 
Terraces overlook this back view, but, truth to tell, the 
view itself is scarcely of sufficient interest to cause the 
terrace to be much frequented. The interior is noteworthy 
for the abundance of marble used in its construction. 
Staircases and balustrades everywhere are made of this 
material, and, in a great measure, the walls of the upper 
galleries are panelled with it. Two inner courtyards, 
lavishly planted with palms and plants, are overlooked by 
the galleries round which the various offices are situated. 
The furniture with which these apartments are fitted is 
rich and becoming ; it, however, possesses no particular 
historic interest. Admission to the various chambers may 
be obtained by letter of introduction to any official in 
authority, who will facilitate the viewing of such apartments 
as may not be in actual use at the time of the visit. 

Here are found the Presidential Offices and the Minis- 
terial Offices of the various Governmental Departments, 
each Minister being in possession of a separate suite of 
apartments according to his requirements. . It is at this 
building that foreign Ministers and other special envoys 
are received in audience by the Chief Magistrate in order 

36 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

to present their credentials, and here also departing 
Ministers or Charges d' Affaires pay a visit to tender their 
formal or official messages of farewell to the President and 
his Ministers. Outwardly, the building is more noteworthy 
for its great length than for any striking point of beauty. 

The Port. 

The Port of Buenos Aires was completed by Madero 
Brothers in 1897, and includes the Riachuelo Port, con- 
structed in 1877, and the Great Southern Railway Company's 
South Dock. Steamers drawing twenty-six feet can enter 
from the River Plate by the North Channel, which enters 
the Port at the North Basin and by the South Channel (eleven 
miles long), which ends at the mouth of the Riachuelo 
River. The entire Channel is buoyed. The Port con- 
sists of four docks, numbered i, 2, 3, and 4, from south to 
north, and two basins. The North Basin has two dry 
docks, that permit the dry-docking of any ship likely to 
enter the Port. There are many extensive warehouses, the 
property of the Government. 

The opening and closing of the dock and flood-gates 
are worked by hydraulic machinery. The fixed cranes and 
derricks employed can lift very heavy weights. The 
Madero Port and the Riachuelo are lighted throughout by 
electricity. There are railway lines and traction engines 
along the dock-sides, as also many travelling cranes and a 
floating crane. The grain-elevators are in Docks 2 and 3. 

DOCK No. i is 620 yards long by 170 yards wide, and 
the depth of water on the sills is 23 feet 9 inches. 

DOCK No. 2 is connected with Dock i by a lock 
95 yards long by 25 yards wide, with a swing-bridge attached. 
The dimensions of this dock are the same as No. i. On 
the east side are three grain warehouses, and there are sets 
of rails to facilitate loading operations. 

DOCK No, 3 is connected with Dock No. 2 by a lock of 

37 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

the same dimensions as that between Nos. i and 2, with 
swing-bridge. It is 750 yards long by 170 yards wide. 
On the east side there are a number of hydraulic cranes for 
loading, and rails for bringing cargo alongside. On the 
west side are warehouses for imports. 

DOCK No. 4 is connected with Dock No. 3 by a lock 
80 yards long and 22 yards wide. It also possesses a 
swing-bridge. It is 680 yards long by 170 yards wide. 
On the west side of this dock there are warehouses. 

EMBARCADERO. On the east side of Dock No. 4, with 
a frontage of about 380 yards, is an embarcadero for the 
shipment of livestock. This embarcadero adjoins the lock 
leading into the North Basin, which is five yards wider 
than any of the others in the Port. It has berthing accom- 
modation for four steamers, with the necessary winches, &c. 

THE NORTH DARSENA is reached from Dock No. 4 by a 
passage 210 yards long by 27 yards wide. It is furnished 
with a swing-bridge and lock gates. 

Exports. 

The principal shipments from the Port of Buenos Aires 
are made up of Wheat, Flour, Quebracho Wood, Oats, 
Horse-hides, Horns, Dried Blood, Bones, Hair, Calf-skins, 
Meal, Meat Extract, Copper, Glycerine, Linseed, Wool, 
Quebracho Extract, Bran, Ox-hides, Tallow, Yerba, Bone- 
ash, Goat-skins, Hide-cuttings, Oilseed Cakes, Beans, 
Minerals, Maize, Frozen Meat, Hay, Butter, Sheepskins, 
Animal Oil, Horn-piths, Sinews, Casein, Nutria-skins, 
Middlings, Birdseed, and Feathers. 

Cable Companies. 

Central and South American Telegraph Company, vt'd 
Galveston, corner of Calles Cuyo and San Martin. 

Pacific and European Telegraph Company, San Martin 
291. 

River Plate Telegraph Company, San Martin 287. 
38 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Telegrafo, Telefonica del Plata, Reconquista 230. 
The above companies all charge $1-04 (gold) per word 
to Great Britain or the United States. 

Live-stock. 

As is well known, the Argentine Republic is the country 
par excellence for the breeding of cattle, and the importance 
of Buenos Aires in this respect cannot be over-estimated. 
Not only is it the principal port for the enormous quantities 
of frozen meat sent all over the world, but as a port 
of importation of live-stock it ranks equally prominent, 
for, though the imports are naturally far smaller than 
the exports, the importation of blood-stock is one of the 
most important factors that have of late years contributed 
to the progress of the Republic. This is best illustrated 
by reference to the official figures. 

As recently as 1895 as much as 50 per cent, of the 
country's cattle was bred from native stock, and therefore 
of inferior quality. In 1908, native- bred stock only 
amounted to 87 per cent. Cross-breeds in 1895 repre- 
sented - 49'2 per cent., and in 1908, 85'! per cent.; whereas 
the pure-blooded cattle in the years indicated increased 
from o'6 per cent, to 6*2 per cent., and a proportionate 
improvement in quality is observable in sheep. 

The animal census now being taken by the agricultural 
authorities of the Republic is not yet completed, but such 
figures as are so far available will tend to convey some idea 
of the prodigious productive powers of Argentina's colossal 
cattle ranches, or estancias, as they are called. In seven 
provinces alone it is computed that there are 25,001,690 
head of horned cattle. When it is considered that there 
still remains another seven provinces and nine vast tracts of 
national territory, the reader may form his own opinion as 
to the country's limitless possibilities in this direction, 
-especially when it is remembered that the whole human 
population of the country is less than seven millions. 

39 



EDEN HOTEL 

IN 

VICENTE LOPEZ. 

(CENTRAL ARGENTINE RAILWAY.) 



Lovely Scenery and most Splendid View of the 

Healthy Situation. River Plate. 



Shooting and Golf at 



Patrons' disposal. 

j* 

Cinematograph 



Cricket and Football 
Arranged. 



Pure Bracing Air. 



and 
Concerts in the Evening. 



MODERATE CHARGES. 

Ideal Summer Resort. 

* 

Within easy access of Town, there being a good train 

service, and the journey only taking 20 minutes. 

-f- 

HIQH=CLASS CUISINE. 

WINES OF THE BEST. 

Proprietor: JUAN THIBAUT. 
40 




View of Eden Hotel and the beautiful Grotto. 



Clubs. 

The following are the principal clubs and social 
societies in Buenos Aires : 

JOCKEY CLUB, Calle Florida 559. Entrance fee, $3000; 
subscription, $120 yearly. Members, 3000. President, 
Dr. Benito Villanueva. Founded in 1882. 

PROGRESO CLUB, Avenida de Mayo 633. Entrance fee, 
$500; subscription, i$io monthly. Members, 1900. 
President, Dr. A. E. Davilo. Founded in 1852. 

STRANGERS' CLUB (Residentes Estrangeros), Calle Barto- 
lome Mitre 476. Entrance fee, $200 ; subscription, 
$10 monthly. Membership, 778. President, W. H- 
J. Dates, Esq. Founded in 1841. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

ENGLISH CLUB, Calle Bartolome Mitre 478. Entrance 
fee, $100; subscription, $100 yearly. Members, 
356. President, J. P. Clarke, Esq. Founded in 1898. 

FRENCH CLUB (Frances), Calle Florida 112. Entrance fee, 
$50; subscription, Sio monthly. Members, 230. 
President, Jose Liguieres. Founded in 1866. 

ITALIAN CLUB (Italiano), Calle Florida 8. Entrance fee, 

$200; subscription, $10 monthly. Members, 580. 

President, L. Tarnassi, Esq. Founded in 1875. 
ARMS CLUB (Circulo de Armas), Calle Corrientes 671. 

Entrance fee, $500; subscription, $17.50 monthly. 

Members, 250. President, M. Pinedo, Esq. Founded 

in 1887. 

SPANISH CLUB (Espanol), Calle Bartolom Mitre 978. 
Entrance fee, $100 ; subscription, $8 monthly. Mem- 
bers, 404. President, Fermin Calzada, Esq. Founded 
in 1871. 

ENGLISH LITERARY SOCIETY (Sociedad Literaria Inglesa), 
Cangallo 536. Entrance fee, $15; subscription, 12 
per quarter. Members, 361. President, Dr. Peard. 
Founded in 1876. 



A List of a fnv of the City's Public Offices and 
Establishments : 

Custom House, Calle Balcarce, corner of Calle Victoria, 
opposite south side of Government House. 

Fire Brigade Headquarters, Calle Belgrano 1551. 

Agricultural Statistics Department, Calle Victoria 318. 

General Statistics Department, Calle Maipii 988. 

Emigration Department, Calle Alsina 627. 

Emigrants' Asylum (Hotel de Emigrantes), next to Retiro 
Station. New one now in course of construction at 
the side of the North Basin. 

42 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Botanical Gardens, Calle Santa Fe 3951. 
[Zoological Gardens, Calles Las Heras and Serrano. 
Administrative Offices of National Lottery, Calle Belgranb 

666. 

National Historical Museum, Calle Defensa 1600. 
National Fine Art Museum, Calle Florida 783. 
Meteorological Office, Calle Viamonte 640. 
National Penitentiary, Calle Las Heras 1580. 
Reformatory for Minors, Calle Caseros, between Calles 

Pasco and Pichincha. 

Women's Correctional Asylum, Calle San Juan 369. 
National Library, Calle Mejico 564. Open, from April i6th 

to October i5th, from 11.30 till 4, and from 8 till 

10 p.m.; from October i6th to April i5th, from 12 

till 5. 
Municipal Library, Calle Corrientes 1615. Open, from 12 

till 5 and 8 till 10 every day, except Sundays and 

holidays. 
Public Ambulance and Hospital Service {Asistencia Piib- 

lica), Calle Esmeralda 30. 

General Prefecture of Ports, Calle 25 de Mayo 269. 
Central Police Department, Calle Moreno 1550. 
.Supreme Federal Court, Calle San Martin 275. 
Naval Asylum, Calle Provincias Unidas 3290, Flores. 
<jlrain Exchange, Calle Puerreydon 190. 
Argentine Society for the Protection of Animals, Calle 

Paraguay 1060. 
Safmiento Society .for the Protection of Animals, Calle 25 

de Mayo 35. 

Argentine Rural Society, Calle Florida 316. 
Society for the Protection of Children, Calle Venezuela 

468. 
Asylum for Orphans and Poor Children, Calle Curapaligiie 

727, Flores. 



43 



THE 

5AVOY HOTEL 

ROSARIO, 

Will be 

Opened on January i, 1910. 

<^8cp < ^ e ^ 

NEWEST & MOST COMFORTABLE 
. . HOTEL IN ARGENTINA. . . 

STEAM HEATING THROUGHOUT. 
. . HOT AND COLD WATER. . . 

ELECTRIC LIGHT A VENTILATORS 
. ... IN ALL ROOMS 

APARTMENTS AND SINGLE ROOMS WITH 
PRIVATE BATHS. 

MAGNIFICENT TERRACE RESTAURANT 
AMERICAN BAR AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

-f- 

MODERATE CHARGES. 

Telegraphic Address: Q- WIDMER, 

* SAVOY,' ROSARIO. Proprietor. 

*44 




Plaza Victoria, Buenos Aires. 



LOS DISTINGUIDOS. 

THE HAVANA CIGAR SHOP. 

Florida corner of Cangallo. 

Buenos Aires. 




When in want of a good Cigar come to us. 
We receive them direct from Havana. 

Sole Agent for 'Pera' Cigarettes 




DE 



CO 



P. E. GIRARD. 

THE 
Cocktail House. 

401, FLORIDA, 401 

BUENOS AIRES. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Freemasonry. 

DISTRICT GRAND LODGE OF ANCIENT FREE AND- 
ACCEPTED MASONS OF ENGLAND : 

Dist. G.M., F. H. Chevallier Boutell, Avenida de Mayo 
651. 

D.D. G.M., Ernest Danvers, Bartolome" Mitre 475. 
D.G. Sec., J. M. Rowbotham, Corrientes 651. 

ENGLISH LODGES OF THE DISTRICT. 

' Excelsior,' No. 617. Meets first and third Thursdays. 

'Star of the South,' No. 1025. Meets -first and third 
Mondays. 

' Victoria,' No. 2329. Meets second Thursday each- 
month and May 24th. 

' Quilmes,' No. 2459. Meets first Saturday each month. 

' St. John's ' (Lomas), No. 2517. Meets first Tuesday 
each month. 

' Trevor Mold,' No. 3293. Meets third Friday in April. 
July and October. 

DISTRICT GRAND CHAPTER OF ENGLAND. 
Grand Supt, F. H. Chevallier Boutell. D.G.S.E... 
H. W. Griggs, Cuyo 1230. 

Masefield Chapter, No. 617. Meets second Monday 
in March, June, September and December. 

Rosario Chapter, No. 1553. Meets second Tuesday in 
January, April, July and October. 

Silver River Chapter, No. 2329. Meets second Monday 
in February, May, August and November. 

Connaught, No. 1025. Meets second Monday in 
January, April, July and October. 

FREEMASONS' HALL : Prince George's Hall, Cuyo 1230. 
46 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



Protestant Churches. 

BISHOP OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS, Right Rev. Edward' 
Francis Every, D. D., M.A., Trin. Col. Cambridge. Buenos 
Aires address : Aristobulo del Val 1637. 

ST. JOHN'S, Calle 25 de Mayo 286. Rector, Rev. J. 
H. de Turri Croft, B.A., Jesus College, Cambridge. 
Private address : Calle 25 de Mayo 286. 

MISSIONS TO SEAMEN, Chaplain, Rev. Arthur B. L. 
Karny, M.A. Private address : Calle 25 de Mayo 286. 
Assistant Chaplain, Rev. F. O. Spanton, Calle 25 de Mayo 
286. 

ST. SAVIOUR'S, BELGRANO. Vicar, Rev. A. O. Tisdall, 
M.A., Oxon. Private Address : The Vicarage, Echevarria 
3252 Belgrano. Organist, G. Lloyd Davies. 

CHRIST CHURCH, Barracas al Norte. Calle Uspallata 
657. Vicar, Rev. Albert G. Fenn, M.B , C.M., Edinburgh. 
Private address : Aristobulo del Val 1637. 

ALL SAINTS', QUILMES, F.C.S. Vicar, Rev. G. H. Knight- 
Clarke, A.K.C. Organist, W. H. Pott. 

HOLY TRINITY, LOMAS (Methodist Episcopal), corner 
of Calles Gascon and Boedo. Pastor, Rev. W. E. Myers. 
Private address : Gascon, 52 Lomas. 

ST. PETER'S, FLORES. Vicar, Rev. Jules Dubourg. 

ST. PAUL'S, Calle Charcas 4670. Presbyter in Charge, 
Rev. William C. Morris. Private address : Uriarte 2572,, 
Palermo. 

SCOTCH PRESBYTERIAN, St. Andrew's, Calle Belgrano 575. 
Minister, Rev. J. W. Fleming, B.D. Private address : 
Ituzaingo 520. Assistant, Rev. D. Bruce Nicol, B.D.. 
Camp Minister, Rev. Niel MacColl. 

( Continued on page 50. ) 

47 



Model Steam Laundry 



Established 
1865. 



This establishment 
is specially equip- 
ped for every de- 
scription of work 
Washing and Iron 
ing carefully done 
for Hotels, Restau 
rants, Hairdresser 
and Boarding 
Houses. 



MODERATE 
CHARGES. 



Calle Herrera, 880. 



Union Telephone 

Ho, Ha fracas. 



NEW SHIRTS 
DRESSED. 

SPECIAL 
ATTENTION 

r.IVEXTOWORK 
FOR 

STEAMERS. 

LINEN 

DELIVERED AT 
24 HOURS' 

NOTICE. 



Proprietor -FELIPE RACHON. 




Expreso 'La Plata,' 

Forwarding Agents. 



<=* 
Cuyo, 447, 

== 




Buenos Aires. 



EMPLOYEES BOARD ALL ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS 
AT MONTEVIDEO. 

Baggage dispatched through Customs and promptly delivered 
to Home, Hotel, or Railway Terminus in 

Buenos Aires or suburbs. 
LUGGAGE & EFFECTS WAREHOUSED. REASONABLE CHARGES. 

Proprietor PEDRO FURLONG. 
PLEASE TO TRY THE DANISH KITCHEN 

' SCANDIA 



FIRST-CLASS 
English Spoken. 



RESTAURANT AND BAR. 
443, MAIPU, 443, BUENOS AIRES. 

48 



VILLA CARAPACHAY 
HOTEL, 



(CENTRAL ARGENTINE RAILWAY.) 

i 




Next the Station and only 14 minutes from the Capital of 
the Republic, 150 trains daily. 



PICTURESQUE SITE FACING THE 
RIVER PLATE. 


FINE PARK. 

* 
FIRST-CLASS ATTENDANCE. 

& 

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION FOR 
FAMILIES. 



EACH APARTMENT IS 

PROVIDED VMTH 

TOILET REQUISITES AND BATH. 

JC 

GREAT CARE PAID 

TO 
THOROUGH SANITATION. 

& 
ELECTRIC LIGHT. 



VENTILATING & HEATING APPARATUS INSTALLED 



Union Telephone : 
7, SAN ISIDRO. 



49 



Coop. Telephone: 
7, OLIVOS. 

o 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

(Continued from page 47.) 

AMERICAN (FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL), Calle Corri- 
entes 718. Resident Bishop, Right Rev. Dr. Frank Milton, 
Bristol. Presiding Elder, Rev. G. R. Howard. Private 
address ; corner of Calles Junin and Charcas. Pastor, Rev. 
W. P. McLaughlin, D.D. Private address: Peru 1552. 
Organist, Professor H. G. Welby, Calle Santo Domingo 862. 

Roman Catholic Church. 

HOLY CROSS CHURCH. Corner of Calles Urquiza and 
Fstados Unidos. 

Very Rev. Fr. John Mory, C.P., Provincial. 
Louis, C.P., Rector. 
,, ,, ,, Fidelis, C.P. Consultor. 
,, Dominic, C.P., Vicar. 

Raphael, C.P., 
., Vincent Logan, C.I'., 
Martin, C.P., 
Patrick, C.P., \ Priests. 

Bernard, C.P., 
Francis, C.P., 

PROVINCIAL OF THE PASSIONIST ORDER in South 
America, Very Rev. John Mory, C.P. 

THE IRISH CATHOLIC ASSOCIATION'S HEADQUARTERS 
arc at 340 Calle Humberto 1. President, Monsignor 
L. E. MacDonnall. 

Cab and Automobile Tariffs. 

There are two classes of cabs or victorias plying for 
hire on the Buenos Aires streets, the tariffs for the first 
class being : 

For the first hour ... ... ... $1.50. 

For each subsequent hour ... ... 81.20. 

For \ hour or fraction ... ... 80 50. 

5 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

BY DISTANCE : 

For the first ten squares ... ... 50 cents. 

For each subsequent ten squares or less 30 

THE SECOND CLASS CABS ARE PRICED AS FOLLOWS : 

For the first hour ... ... $1.30. 

For each subsequent hour ... ... $o So. 

For J hour or fraction ... ... $0.30. 

BY DISTANCE : 

For the first ten squares ... . .. 30 cents. 

For each subsequent ten squares or less 20 

Automobiles. With Taximetre. 

From 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. First 1200 metres 50 cents. 

Each subsequent 300 metres ... 10 ,, 

For each wait of 2\ minutes ... 10 ,, 

From 12 p.m. to 7 a.m. First 800 metres 50 

Each subsequent 300 metres ... 10 

For each wait of two minutes ... 10 

Without Taximetre. 

First hour ... ... ... $3.00. 

Each subsequent hour ... ... $2.00. 

Every hour ;.. ... ... $0.50. 

Dispatching Agencies. 

On arriving at the docks, the passenger should exercise 
great care as to whom he entrusts his luggage as many 
of the men who clamour for customers whenever a passen- 
ger steamer arrives are most extortionate in their charges 
unless some definite price be agreed on beforehand. 
Amongst those firms of forwarding agents and carriers who 
can be recommended are the ' Expreso La Plata,' Cuyo 447, 
and the 'Villalonga Company.' The employees of either 
of these firms are to be recognised on the wharf-side by the 
uniform caps bearing the name of the firm, and such men 
may be safely trusted with the luggage. 

5' 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Cost of Living. 

There are a great number of private boarding-houses 
and ' pensions ' in the city and suburbs, at prices to suit all 
purses. The full ' pension ' for a single man can be 
obtained for about $80 per month, upwards, but anything 
cheaper is certainly not to be recommended. The actual 
necessaries of life, such as meat, bread, and some kinds of 
vegetables are by no means dear, the meat especially only 
costing about half of its price in England. At the same 
time groceries are dear, good fruit ditto, and all the minor 
accessories equally so, whilst rents are so abnormally high 
as to be altogether out of proportion. 

Scope for Labour. 

Domestic services are very highly paid, and a house- 
maid who, in England, would jump at the offer of 2^1. a 
year with every other Sunday afternoon ' off' would have no 
trouble, once she knew a little of the language, in getting a 
situation at $40 per month (or say, just over 40!. a year) and 
any reasonable number of holidays she might stipulate for. 

Clerical labour is in very little demand and remuner- 
ative positions even for expert book-keepers, correspondents, 
shorthand-typists, &c. , are difficult to find, though by no 
means impossible. The young man with the ordinary 
knowledge of office work generally manages to obtain 
employment on one of the great railways until his increasing 
knowledge of the language enables him to improve his 
position. A beginner on the railway staff will receive from 
8100 to 150 per month, but his bare board and lodging 
will cost at least 80, apart from washing, clothing and out- 
side expenses. 

Mechanical labour of almost any kind is always in 
demand, and the steady artisan, be he plumber, carpenter, 
metal worker, smith, wheelwright, &:c., need never long be 
out of employment if he is a steady man. 

5* 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Engineers, civil, mechanical, railway, electrical, or 
marine are also eagerly sought after, and experts in the 
automobile line never have to seek very far. 

There are also very good openings for engineering and 
architectural draughtsman and designers, whilst black and 
white artists, especially caricaturists, have a very fair 
chance. 

Agricultural labour is, of course, in constantly increasing 
demand, but it must be of the worker and not the drone 
class. Capitalists big and small, providing they are practical 
agriculturists or stock-breeders, have splendid opportunities 
for success by the exercise of a little good judgment. 

Cattle Auction Marts. 

A large percentage of the importers of fine blood-stock 
from England and Scotland are Scotchmen, and an 
interesting hour or two can always be spent at either of the 
two great auction marts, Bullrich's or Iriondo's (the former 
in Calle San Martin '248, and the latter Calle San Martin 
149) where the animals are exhibited. In cattle, a decided 
preference for shorthorns is shown, although the Polled 
Angus and Hereford are both establishing positions for 
themselves, magnificent specimens of all three breeds are 
being constantly brought over to enrich the Republic's 
stocks and almost fabulous prices are paid for famous 
champions. In sheep, Lincolns are far and away the most 
popular, though Rambouillets and Leicesters both have their 
partisans. Comparatively few pigs are imported, those 
which come out being principally Yorkshires or Berkshires. 

Horse breeding has been brought to such perfection that 
no opportunity is lost to continue improving the blood, 
and magnificent Shires, Percherons, Hackneys, Yorkshire 
coaching horses and even Shetland ponies are usually to be 
seen at one or other of the two great marts. All kinds of 
farmyard birds are also imported, besides a number of dogs, 

53 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

principally collies, greyhounds, and fox-terriers. A visit to 
these yards in the busy season conveys a fair idea of the 
value of Argentine markets to home breeders, and is one 
that should certainly be made. 

Argentine Estancias. 

Any visitor to this country who is fortunate enough to 
possess a letter of introduction to any of the estancia owners 
should lose no time before presenting his credentials. The 
estancia is, of course, the real supply of the Republic's 
riches, and no one who has not seen an Argentine estancia 
is qualified to speak of the country. It is a sight such as 
is not to be seen in any other part of the world, and the 
larger owners, scorning to measure by acres, seldom even 
speak about miles, and count their estates in leagues ! 
The herds of cattle (or rodeos) are as remarkable for their 
numbers as for their quality, and some of the home buildings 
are veritable palaces, although in some cases, miles away 
from their neighbours. Hedges are unknown, wire-fencing 
supported by quebracho posts being used instead. So vast 
are some of these estates that automobiles are generally 
used by the proprietor or other person making a tour of 
inspection, and even miniature railways are not unknown. 
It is no great rarity for an ' estanciero ' to entertain a house- 
party of fifty or sixty guests, and as many of these bring 
their grooms, 'peons' (men-of-all-work), &c., with them, it 
is obvious that neither the hospitality nor the accom- 
modation can be very scanty. A few days on an estancia 
is an experience, a surprise, a revelation, and should most 
decidedly be indulged in by those who possess the oppor- 
tunity of doing so. 

The Bolsa (see illustration, page 35). 
The Bolsa or Stock Exchange is only a building of 
public interest by reason of the nature of its business, and 
certainly not for any architectural beauty or historical 

54 




Escuela Naval Militaiy. Buenos Aires. 



[Photo : H. G. Olds. 



Manuel Qampoi 

Old Established 



Cigar Stores. 



COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF 

Havanna Cigars and Havanna, 

British, Turkish, and 

Egyptian Tobaccos 

and Cigarettes. 

LARGE ASSORTMENT OF SMOKERS' 
REQUISITES. 



SAN MARTIN, 250 252, 
BUENOS AIRES. 



A La Paz, 

131, Calle Suipacha, 131 
Buenos Aires. 

-$- 

Jose Qoquengniot, 

Special Establishment for 
Full and Half- Mourning. 

Millinery &* every descriptiott 
of Garments made up on 

the premises. 

A most complete assortment of first- 
class goods kept in stock. 
*%, 

131, Calle Suipacha, 131 
Buenos Aires. "S^SS? ! 

Country Orders Receive Special 
Attention. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

connection. With entrances in the Plaza Victoria, and 
another in Calle Bartolome Mitre, it lays claim only to be 
what it actually is a business house pure and simple. 
Here are transacted all such affairs as stock and share 
dealing, and it is also the place where official transactions 
in Governmental bonds, rates of exchange, gold premiums, 
&c., are settled, as also grain and shipping speculations or 
investments. It has a membership of about 5000. divided 
into two classes ; brokers or agents, and ordinary members. 

The Cathedral (see illustration, page 19). 

Besides this Cathedral in the Plaza Mayo, many of the 
Buenos Aires churches are worth a visit, if only to see some 
of the ornate mural decorations in the interior. Amongst 
the best examples are the Las Victorias (Paraguay 1216), 
Pilar (Junin 1950), La Merced (corner of Calles Reconquista 
and Cangallo), San Miguel (corner of Bartolom Mitre and 
Suipacha), and San Nicolas (corner of Carlos Pelligrini and 
Corrientes), whilst San Domingo Church, at the corner of 
Calles Defensa and Belgrano is interesting from quite 
another cause, and this is that there are kept the British 
flags, captured from Whitelock's defeated soldiery, and here 
also are to be seen several cannon-balls still buried in the 
eastern tower of the church. They are very high up and 
some people are heard to say that the ' cannon-balls ' are of 
wood, plastered into the stone for effect. Be this as it may, 
there they are and look just as interesting as cannon-ballo 
could look. 

Lezama Park. 

One of the prettiest parks in Buenos Aires is the Parque 
Lezama which, although in one of the most papulous parts 
of the town, is so laid out that in many parts its rustic 
charm almost makes one forget the ceaseless hum of the 
busy city all around. In parts it is beautifully laid out with 
flower-beds, and many examples of rare botanical specimens, 

56 



THE 



LOOK IN YOUR] 
POCKET ! 



\ is stamped 
on your PENCIL 




Always in stock 



AT 



Mitchell's Book Store 

580, CANGALLO, 578 
BUENOS AIRES. 




57 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

consisting of plants, palms and ferns. In other parts 
vegetation is allowed to grow more or less wild, and the 
park is a delightful spot in which to spend a spare hour or 
two roaming through its shady groves or sitting on one of 
the benches in peaceful enjoyment of a book. For the 
younger mind, untrained as yet to the peace of quiet paths 
or the delight of books, there are roundabouts, fields for 
playing ball, and other glimpses of that Paradise that appeals 
to the young. 

In this park, also, there is a small Historical Museum, 
the contents of which may all be seen in the brief space 
of an hour or so. The most striking exhibit is the sleeping 
apartment of Argentina's greatest general, San Martin. 
Other of the Republic's great warriors are represented by 
the uniforms worn by them in life, their swords and ribands 
of decoration. Pictures, arms, relics and curiosities com- 
plete the collection, which is open to the public from 12 till 4 
on Sundays only. The guardians of this treasure-house are 
old military veterans, remarkable for their age and past 
valour. 

Cemeteries. 

The lover of sculpture would do well to pass a few hours 
in the northern cemetery, known as the Recoleta. Set upon 
a hill laid out into a beautiful little park, the Recoleta is 
said to be second only to the famous cemetery of Milan for 
the beauty of its monuments and vaults. Some of these 
vaults are built almost like small houses or villas, and the 
flowers, vases and ornaments on the table-like altars seen 
through the glass doors so much resemble the table 
decorations beloved of the artistic housekeeper, that it 
comes almost as a shock to suddenly note the sombre, 
brass-fitted coffins that line the walls, and to realise that the 
pretty villa is a charnel-house. On Saints' Day, or All 
Souls' Day, a visit to this cemetery is not easily forgotten. 
The people of all classes assemble here to p.iy tribute to 

53 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

the memory of the beloved dead ; vaults are thrown open so 
that members of the family may renew flowers and altar- 
cloths, and the whole day is sometimes spent inside these 
weird little houses of the dead. The paths dividing the 
vaults are all paved and laid out in the form of streets, and 
the effect of seeing these streets thronged with an ever- 
moving crowd exchanging commonplaces in this city of the 
dead, whilst on all sides the magnificent but silent villas 
give back no echo of the animation outside is bizarre in 
the extreme. 

In this burial-place are to be seen the family vaults of 
Argentine's great ones, and every few steps the eye is caught 
by a bronze tablet over the door of some mansion of death, 
bearing a name that is even more boldly blazoned on the 
scroll of history. 

The other great cemetery is called the Chacarita, and is 
best reached by the Lacroze line of tramcars. This 
cemetery covers a very great area, but the monuments are 
not so imposing as those to be seen in the Recoleta. Oi>e 
portion of the Chararita is reserved for Protestant burials, 
and of this a considerable portion is known as the British 
section. 

The Zoological Gardens. 

The Buenos Aires Zoological Gardens are the property 
of the Municipality, and, among the many places of recre- 
ation and instruction for which the city should be grateful 
to the Municipal authorities, these beautiful gardens figure 
very prominently. 

They owe their existence to the initiative of General 
Sarmiento, who, in the last year of his Presidency (June 
1874) put before Congress a projected law to establish 
Zoological Gardens in the ' 3 de Febrero ' Park. The 
collection of animals proceeded very slowly, General 
Sarmiento himself being the first donor, giving three 
specimens. Other donations followed by degrees, princi- 

59 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

pally given by private individuals, until a fairly representative 
collection was gathered together, and eventually, in 1888, 
the Government decided to present that part of the park 
devoted to the Zoological Collection, to the Municipality. 
From that date forward, official documents established the 
existence of the Buenos Aires Zoological Gardens, as being 
apart from the ' 3 de Febrero ' Park which they adjoin. 
Well aware of the instructive value of such an establishment 
and recognising, as well, the hygienic value of an open air 
exhibition likely to attract numerous visitors, the Munici- 
pality spared no pains to increase the attractions as much as 
possible. For all their utmost efforts, however, the gardens 
were only very little frequented until 1903, in which year 
the populace seemed suddenly to develop a keen interest in 
the really excellent exhibition open to them. From that 
time forward, this interest has increased by leaps and bounds, 
so that in 1907, 1,135,730 persons passed through the Gates, 
and nearly a million and a half in 1908. 

There are four gates of entrance to the Gardens, the 
principal of which is in the Plaza Italia, facing the colossal 
equestrian statue of Garibaldi, the great Italian Patriot and 
Liberator. Other entrances are in Avenida Sarmiento, the 
wide and pretty thoroughfare named after the originator of 
the Gardens ; in the Avenida Alvear ; and in Calle Acevedo, 
at the corner of Calle Cabello. 

The price of admission to the Gardens is fixed at the 
extremely moderate sum of 10 cents, and guide-books are 
obtainable gratis by application at the Administrative 
Offices in the grounds themselves. They are open from 
sunrise to sunset, and are well worth a lengthy visit. The 
staff, a most capable and efficient one, consists of the 
Director, Senor Clemente Onelli ; the Administrator, Serior 
Pedro Isla ; the Secretary, Senor Horacio L. Cadelago ; 
Inspectors J. Liajovitzky and V. Olivera ; the chief cage 
Inspector, Senor V. Dominguez; Agriculturalist, Senor 

60 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Manuel Garcia ; eight ticket office officials, eight porters, 
eight artisans, eighteen groundsmen, twenty-four keepers 
and eight gardeners. As an instructive institution the value 
of the Gardens is so well known that free admittance is 
allowed to all soldiers, as also to school- pupils when 
accompanied by a master. 

By order of the Minister of War, military bands play 
within the grounds on Sundays ; the tramway company 
provides a band on Thursdays, and the Chief of Police 
supplies a band on Saturdays. Music commences at 3 p.m. 
The attractions ofiered to children consist of a minature 
steam tramway and liliputian railway train, merry-go-rounds, 
swings, marionette shows, rides on ponies, camels, llamas, &c. 

The Gardens are reached by tramcars from almost all 
parts of the city and suburbs. Visitors are warned against 
pickpockets, on Sundays especially. 

Before passing to the next item, it is interesting to note 
that, such is the great increase of interest in animals 
displayed by the Argentine people in recent years that 
1 Animal Day ' was officially recognised by the Government 
last year, Argentina being the first of the Latin countries to 
adopt the idea. It was brought about mainly owing to the 
efforts of Dr, Albarracin, President of the Argentine Animals' 
Protection Society and Sefior Onelli, Director of the 
Gardens. As the weather on the day set apart for the cele- 
bration (May ist) was unpropitious, the festival was estab- 
lished on the following day, when some 40,000 school- 
children assembled in the Zoological Gardens to do honour 
to the day. 

A FEW USEFUL HINTS. 

i. Do not fear the Custom House. No matter how 
large your wardrobe, in reason. The quantity of personal 
luggage allowed duty free is generous to a degree, and, 
except in cases of flagrant smuggling, no inconvenience .is 

61 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

ever experienced. Should you carry any merchandise, be 
sure to declare it, otherwise you will pay a fine and the 
goods will be confiscated. 

2. Remember that civility towards officials is the golden 
key to getting prompt despatch. 

3. When approaching an official, no matter how lowly 
his rank, raising your hat will give you no trouble and save 
you quite a lot. 

4. On no account enter any public office, even though 
it be only the waiting-hall of a police-station, with the head 
covered. 

5. Buy at the best shops ; it is cheapest in the long run. 

6. There are about a hundred million Britons and 
Americans in the worlda very mighty number. But there 
are about thirteen hundred million people on the earth, 
which shows that ' there are others.' 

7. The Buenos Aires cabman is just as honest as the 
generality of his kind in other parts of the world ; no less 
so but no more so. 

8. If your ship arrives late, pack a few necessaries in a 
hand-bag before coming ashore, in case it is too late to 
have all your luggage passed through the Custom House 
that evening. 

9. If going a long railway journey, book your sleeping 
apartment some time previously, and do not leave it over 
until you arrive at the station just before the train starts. 

10. Forget that a dollar is worth is. 8</., and only 
remember that its purchasing power is equal to that of 
a shilling. Otherwise, you will always think you are being 
robbed. 

11. Keep your notes separately until quite used to 
them, as, when soiled, a five-dollar bill may easily be given 
away in mistake for a dollar. Special purses for holding 
paper money can be obtained at Mitchell's, 580 Cangallo. 

62 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

12. Do not carry arms. It is quite unnecessary, and 
may get you into trouble unless the necessary permit be 
taken out. 

13. Lay in a plentiful supply of stamps when at the 
post-office, as, excepting here (Buenos Aires) or at some of 
the big hotels, they are difficult to obtain. 

14. Remember that tramcars are only allowed to stop 
at street corners, and not in the middle of a block. 

15. If you are in need of reading matter, join Mitchell's 
Circulating Library at Cangallo 580, one door from Florida. 

Dogs (Cave Canem). 

Owners of dogs who elect to reside in the suburbs are 
advised to beware of a practice still in vogue. This is the 
existence of ' dog-carts.' At one time, when Buenos Aires 
was far more like an ' off the earth ' village than it now is, 
dogs multiplied to such an extent that, especially in the 
hot season, they became a positive danger rabies threat- 
ened to wreak havoc. It was then decided that stray or 
dangerous dogs should be lassoed, and, if not claimed 
within a certain time, destroyed. The measure, stern 
though it was, was perfectly justified, and at the time was 
most opportune. Nowadays, however, this regulation is 
absurd almost beyond belief. In the suburbs, dog-carts 
still make their rounds, attended by a mounted policeman 
and some half a dozen men armed with lassoes made of 
twisted hide attached to the end of a long whip-staff. 
With this they capture any dog they find straying. Even 
when not actually injured by the lasso, a dog so caught is 
very often injured beyond cure, for the sudden strangula- 
tion cows his spirit, and when thrust inside the dog-cart, 
together perhaps with a score or so of unfortunate fellow- 
captives, he runs the risk of bites, worrying, or contagion. 
(Continued on page 66.) 

63 



PARIS HOTEL 

1161, Avenida de Mayo, 1199 
Buenos Aires. 




ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



150 ROOMS WITH BALCONIES 
ON THE AVENIDA DE MAYO. 



THE DINING HALL IS THE 

LARGEST & FINEST IN THE CITY. 

^- 

RESTAURANT A LA CARTE. 



DEJEUNER AND 
DINNER CONCERTS. 



TELEPHONE IN 
ALL ROOMS. 




Plaza Lavalle, City of Buenos Aires. 



[Photo: A.W.B.&Co. 



BIER CONVENT 



EDWARD MONTI'S 

BAR RESTAURANT AND 
BEER SALOON. 



OPEN ALL NIGHT. 

<3~ 

SPECIAL ROOMS FOR FAMILIES 
AND BANQUETS. 

+ 

CUYO corner of MAIPU, 
BUENOS AIRES. 

Teh. Cooperativa : 3811 CENTRAL. 
Union: 1277 AVENIDA. 



A. GARBARINO, 

WORKING OPTICIAN. 




Expert in the exact Execution of Specialists' 

Prescriptions. Spectacles and Folders to suit 

any defect of the Sight. 

OPERA, FIELD AND 
MARINE GLASSES. 

All Work executed with promptness and 

Reliability. 

The Workshop is under the personal control 
of the Proprietor. 

SPECIAL LINE. 

Lemaire's Opera, Field and Marine Glass 
with adjustable Lens, $20. 

Esmeralda, 268, Buenos Aires. 

E 



GUIDE TO BUKNOS AIRES. 

( Continued from p. 63. ) 

Despite efforts on the part of the Society for the Protection 
of Animals, and energetic protests through the Press, the 
practice still continues, and is one of the very few instances 
where the Argentine Republic is one whit behind any other 
nation in advanced civilisation. Therefore, when you want 
your dog to have an outing it will be best to be near him. 

Dog licences should be obtained at the nearest police- 
station (or ' comisarias '), the cost being #5.00. 



SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 




The League of the Empire. 

Branch in the Argentine Republic, founded \$th October, 1907. 
COUNCIL, 1908-1909. 

President : 
Walter B. Townley, H.B.M. Minister. 

Vice-Presidents : 

A. Carnegie Ross, C.B. James Begg. 

J. Monteith Drysdale. Lovat A. Mulcahy, M.D. 

Councillors : 

F. A. Chevallier Boutell. A. Mackintosh. 
F. Maitland Heriot. Rymer O. Watson. 

H. H. Leng. A. M. Wilson. 

Thomas Lloyd. 
66 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Hon. Treasurer : 

Charles Curtois, Anglo-South American Bank, Ltd., Buenos 

Aires. 

Hoti. Secretary : 
P. A, Grassick, Calle Cangallo 666, Buenos Aires. 

EXTRACT FROM THE CONSTITUTION. 
r. A Branch of ' The League of the Empire ' is esta- 
blished in the Argentine Republic with the following 
objects : 

() To bring British subjects resident in the Republic 
together, and to keep them in touch with the 
Mother Country and the Colonies and Depend- 
encies. 

(/>) To implant and foster the growth of those qualities 
which have specially contributed to the formation 
and the development of the British race and Em- 
pire, such as responsibility, duty, sympathy, self- 
sacrifice. 

(c) To promote the increase and diffusion of knowledge 
respecting the component parts of the British Empire 
by means of lectures, lantern-lectures for children, 
reading of papers, and holding discussions, &c. (but 
no paper shall be read nor any discussion be per- 
mitted to take place tending to give the League 
a political or sectarian character) ; to facilitate in- 
terchange of experiences amongst persons from all 
the Dependencies ; to establish a' reading-room and 
library, in which recent and authentic intelligence 
upon imperial subjects may be constantly available, 
and a museum for the collection and exhibition of 
British, Colonial, and Indian productions. 
67 



Hamburg South - America n 
Steamship Company. 



HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE. 

PASSENGERS AND MAIL SERVICE BETWEEN 

BUENOS AIRES, RIO DE JANEIRO, 

BAHIA, LISBON, VIGO, 

SOUTHAMPTON, BOULOGNE, 

and HAMBURG. 



FLEET : 

CAP VILANO. CAP ORTEGAL. 

K. FRIEDRICH AUGUST. K. WILHELM II. 

CAP BLANCO. 

Three Sailings per Month. 

Return tickets from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro 
are issued valid for six months at 150 paper. 

TO LISBON IN 16 DAYS. 



A. M. DELFINO & BRO. 

442, CUYO, 454, BUENOS AIRES, 

68 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

(d} To provide opportunities for social reunion, and to 
make arrangements for the proper celebration of 
national festivals. 

2. Membership shall be limited to British subjects, their 
children and grandchildren wherever born, if they desire it, 
and shall consist of three classes, />., (a) Members, (b) Lady 
Members, and (c) Junior Members. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

(a) Members ... ..; $5 m/1 per annum. 

(b) Lady Members ... 3 ,, ,, 

(c) Junior Members ... 2 ,, ,, 

This Branch, at the last Annual General Meeting held 
in June, 1908, possessed 558 members, and the number is 
rapidly increasing. It is affiliated to the London League, 
and possesses a useful library containing books of reference 
dealing with all the British Colonies. A council meeting 
is held once a month, the date duly advertised in the local 
Press. 



The British and American Benevolent 
Society 

is one of the very oldest benevolent societies in the River 
Plate, having been originally founded more than sixty years 
ago. Its object is to give assistance in such cases where 
the applicant is a deserving but unfortunate member of the 
English-speaking race. The society's office is Room No. 6, 
Calle 25 de Mayo 158, and the meetings, &c., are generally 
held either at the hall of St. Andrew's Church or at that of 
the American Church. In 1908, 284 cases were relieved, 
nearly $2,000 being distributed among them. In addition 

69 



INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 

FOUNDED IN 1886. 

(Incorporated with Colegio Naclonal Norte.i 




,OL I H VIEW. 



PRI.NCIFAL : C. Alberto Porchiettl. VICE-DIRECTOR : P. Chelia. 

Medal Awarded at the Buenos Aires Exhibition of 1898. 

OLIVOS (Cent. Argentine Ry.). BURGES IF.C.BA. y R. . 



to this, the society also lent money in 142 deserving cases, 
the sum involved being nearly $4000. 

The present Committee is : 

Hon. Presidents: H.B.M. Minister and U.S.A. Minister. 
Chairman : Mr. John C. Zimmermann. 

Hon. Treasurer: Mr. James Marr. 
Hon. Secretary: Mr. Hope Gibson. 

Ex-officio Members : 

Mr. Claud F. W. Russell, ist Secretary British Legation ; 
Mr. Charles S. Wilson, ist Secretary U.S.A. Legation : 
Mr. A. Carnegie Ross, C.B., HB.M. Consul ; the 
U.S.A. Consul-General; Dr. John O'Connor; the Very 
Rev. Father Superior of the Passionist Fathers ; the 
Rev. J. H. de Turri Croft, the Rev. Dr. A. G. Fenn, 
the Rev. J. W. Fleming, the Rev. G. P. Howard, the 
Rev. VV. P. McLaughlin, and the Rev. D. Bruce Nicol. 
70 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Ordinary Members : 

Mrs. Brookes, Mrs. Hallett, Mrs. Rayner, Mrs. R. H. 
Roberts, and Messrs. B. A. Shuman, F. B. Purdy, 
Harry Tudor, C. H. Meruies, and E. N. Davies. 

Superintendent : Mr. Alexander Law. 



The Salvation Army in the River Plate. 

The River Plate Branch of the Salvation Army was 
started in January, 1890, in Calle Buen Orden, by Colonel 
Thurman and Captain (now Brigadier) Wm. T. Bonnett, 
who were specially commissioned by General Booth and 
sent out to this country. As is the case with most pioneer 
enterprises, the first years of the work were marked by most 
strenuous struggling and much uphill fighting before a 
firm footing was established in the Republic. The greatest 
difficulty lay in the difference of language and the fact that 
the advance-guard was entirely without friends or any kind 
of influence except their own earnestness and perseverance. 
Yet, undaunted by difficulties and obstacles, these peaceful 
crusaders of a later day went about their mission in such a 
way that, at the present time, there are thirty-one Corps 
and Outposts in the River Plate Republics, besides seven 
Social Branches and the Buenos Aires Night Shelter for 
poor men. There are seventy-eight officers and employees 
engaged in the work, in addition to seventy-four local 
officers. These latter devote their spare time working for 
the Army without remuneration of any kind. The Terri- 
torial Headquarters are at Calle Rivadavia 3290, Brigadier 
Wm. T. Bonnett being Territorial Commander and Major 
G. H. Souter, General Secretary. Last year's work in- 
cluded the providing of 78,565 beds and 164,394 meals, 
apart from those provided at the Industrial Home. This 
is situated at 3047 Calle Humberto i, and here 1192 days 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

of temporary employment were found for the destitute, 
who, in addition to board and lodging, were also given a 
small wage until more remunerative employment could be 
found. The Home has only been established two years, 
and is making rapid progress. The principal industry is 
the sorting and baling of paper and chopping and bundling 
of wood. 

The Army has acquired its own buildings at .Pergamino, 
La Plata, Banfield, Junin, Bahia Blanca, and Concepcion 
del Uruguay, whilst the Sailors' Homes at Ingeniero White 
and Ensenada are the property of the Army on fiscal 
grounds. In all, 4414 meetings were held last year, the 
attendance being 144,488 persons. There were also 470 
open-air meetings (usually on Sunday afternoons), and 
2974 officers took part. The principal corps are situated as 
follows : 

No. i Corps, Calle Rivadavia 3290, Buenos Aires. 

No. 2 Corps, Calle Moreno 1900, Buenos Aires. 

Training Home, Flores. 

Sailors' Mission, Calle P. Mendoza, Boca (B.A.). 

Ensenada Sailors, Home, Grand Dock. 

Ingeniero White Sailors' Home, Southern Railway's 

Grounds. 

La Plata Corps, Calle 41, No. 320. 
Junin Corps, Calle Rioja. 
Pergamino Corps, Calle Alberti. 
Bahia Blanca Corps, Calle Moreno. 
Rosario Corps, Calle Independencia 353. 
Santa Fe Corps, Calle Junin 341. 
Concordia Corps, Corner of Calles Pellegrini and 

Monte Caseros. 

Monte Caseros Corps, Calle Rioja. 
Cordoba Corps, Calle 9 de Julio 138. 
Concepcion del U. Corps, Calle Rioja. 
Monte Video Corps, Calle Nueva York 13 

72 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Monte Video Sailors' Home, Florida 54. 
Rosario Corps, Calle Gran. 
Paysandii Corps, Calle Queguay. 
Salta Corps, Calle Arapay. 
San Eugenio Corps, Calle F. C. 

The Army's press organ, El Cruzado, has a circulation 
of 83,000. 



Young: Men's Christian Association of 
Buenos Aires. 

This Branch of the Y.M.C.A. was organized May 6th, 
1902, with A. Carnegie Ross, Esq., C.B , H.B. M.'s Consul, 
as its first President. 

On opening the first premises, the list of foundation 
members had reached 201 names, and this number has 
steadily increased until, at the close of the seventh year, 
there are about 700 members in the Central Branch and 
150 in Barracas Branch. 

In 1906 an offer was received from friends of the move- 
ment in the United States to give % 100,000 U.S. gold on 
condition that a similar amount be raised by friends in 
Buenos Aires for the erection of suitable buildings. 

A special Building Fund Committee was named, in- 
cluding leading citizens of the British, German, North 
American, and Argentine communities here, and a Com- 
mittee of young men of the Association to co-operate with 
them. The result of the effort was that the amount was 
raised by gifts from 1300 people, thus securing the splendid 
conditional offer which had been made, and giving to the 
Association a fund equal to ^"40,000. 

A house and lot at Avenida Monies de Oca 958 was 
purchased, and put in order for the Barracas Branch, at a 
cost of $52,000 m/n. 

A site for the central building on Paseo Colon, between 

73 



The Best of All 



ARE 



THE RIO 

at 20 Cents, and 

CIGUENA 



at 30 Cents. 



Imported by 



SPINOSSA, CATTELA & Co. 



Restaurant 



and 



Bar Maipu. 

316, MAIPU, 320 
BUENOS AIRES. 



OPEN DAY & NIGHT 



ORCHESTRA OF LADY 
PERFORMERS. 



Proprietors: NOUILHAN BfOS. 



Cafe de Paris 

Proprietress : 
Widow of F. SEMPC. 

425, CANGALLO, 425 

(Upstairs) 

BUENOS AIRES. 



SALOONS for Banquets, Dinner Panics, Halls 
and Weddings, c., ACCOMMODATING i5<j 



Special Attendance and Catering in all its 

branches, for Dinners, Luncheons, Picnics, 

&c., &c. 



This establishment can be specially recom- 
mended/arils Complete Assortment of the best 
Foreign It'incs imported direct from centre of 
p> ad net 'on. 

NOTK. Wedding Feasts & Luncheons. All 
kinds of Choice Castries and Made-up Dislic-s 
sent out when ordered with One Day's Notice. 
All kinds of Ice Creams and Bombes, ( 
&c., &c. 



No connection with any other House. 



'La Fama' 



Sktotller & iiealcr in 



A Complete Assortment always 

kept in Stock of Jewellery and 

Diamonds at Half the Price 

offered by Dealers in Gems. 

All Goods are Sold under a 
Written Warranty. 

SPECIAL ESTABLISHMENT FOR 
HIGH-CLASS WATCHES. 

CALLE SAN MARTIN, 240 
BUENOS AIRES. 

PROPRIETOR : JULIO BURREDO. 



74 




Paseo-Recoleta, Buenos Aires. 



{Photo: H. G. Olds. 



Victoria and Alsina, was purchased at a cost of $137,000 
m/n, and plans are fast taking shape for the erection of the 
new central building. 

The Association offers special advantages to young men 
recently arrived in the city, as it conducts an Information 
Department to assist in finding decent lodgings, in securing 
employment, and in many other ways. 

It conducts Night Classes for the study of Spanish, 
English, commercial subjects, &c., and has a well-stocked 
reading-room, a swimming-club, Sunday afternoon meetings 
for men, and many other features of the modern Y. M.C.A. 

The annual subscription is $20 m/n, which may be paid 
quarterly. 

75 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Board of Trustees. 
R. Inglis Runciman, President. 
H. Fuhrmann, Hon. Secretary. 

Wm. C. Dunn, Herbert Gibson, John C. Zimmermann 
(e \-offiao). 

Officers and Directors. 
John C. Zimmermann, President. 
James Begg, Vice -President. 
J. Monteith Drysdale, Hon. Treasurer . 
H. R. Storer, Hon. Secretary. 
Dr. John J. J. Kyle, VV. Field, W. Bramwell, 

A. Carnegie Ross, C.B., Hugh Wilson, Dr. Lovat, 

A. Mulcahy. 

Executive Officers. 

B. A. Shuman, General Secretary. 

C. J. E \vald, Secietary for Student U'ork. 
R. D. Christian, Assistant Secretary. 

G. H. Smith, Assistant Secretary. 

Premises. 
Moreno 452. Telephone (Union), 2785 Avenida. 



St. Andrew's Society of the River Plate. 

Wherever more than two or three Scotchmen are found 
together it may be generally taken for granted that there 
exists a St. Andrew's Society, so loyal are they to the 
traditions and customs of ' Auld Reekie.' Therefore, there 
is no cause for surprise that here in Buenos Aires, where 
some of our greatest business men, most famous engineers, 
and successful men in every trade and profession are natives 
of Scotland, the St. Andrew's Society of the River Plate is 
one of the most influential of its kind, and certainly is 

76 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

carried on in a most practical and businesslike manner- 
It attains its majority this year, having been founded 
twenty-one years ago. The main objects of the Society 
are to foster the national sentiment, encourage the main- 
tenance of Scotch customs, and devote attention to de- 
serving charitable objects. Last year alone more than 2000 
dollars were distributed by the Benevolent Fund. 

A golf tournament is held yearly, and a special cup is 
given, competitors for this being members of the Society. 

St. Andrew's Day is always celebrated by a banquet, 
laid in some suitable hall, and other social functions include 
at least one concert annually, social evenings, and compe- 
titions in Scotch singing and dancing. 

It had a grand total of 445 members at the last annual 
general meeting, the annual subscription being $5. 

The present office-bearers are : 

Chairman : Mr. Charles J. Martin, B. Mitre 476. 
Hon. Secretary: Mr. John McKechnie, B. Mitre 400. 

Hon. Treasurer: Mr. J. Monteith Drysdale, C.A. 
Florida 77. 

Members : Rev. J. W. Fleming, B. D. ; Mr. A. Car- 
negie Ross, C.B.; Mr. Charles H. Roberts. 



The North American Society of the 
River Plate. 

The objects of the above Society, according to its 
constitution, is ' to keep alive the love of country and foster 
the spirit of patriotism ; to provide and maintain a place of 
meeting ; to properly celebrate national days of festival or 
thanksgiving ; and for such other purposes as will advance 
the interests of our country, encourage and maintain friendly 
relations with the country of our residence, and assist in 

77 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

promoting closer commercial union between North America 
and the countries of the River Plate.' 

Hitherto it has possessed no premises of its own, but 
at its last annual general meeting (April 1909) it was 
decided that premises should be acquired for occupancy 
in 1910. The members comprise all the most influential 
commercial men among the North-American community of 
Buenos Aires, and the Society interests itself considerably 
in increasing North-American commerce in the Republic. 

The present Committee consists of: 
President : Mr. F. B. Purdie. 
Vice-President : Mr. John C. Zimmermann. 
Treasurer: Mr. Batson. 
Secretary: Mr. Huntingdon. 
Working Committee: Mr. F. C. Cook, Mr. E. P. 

Graves, Dr. Kimball, Mr. Wheatley, Dr. Webster, 

Mr. Odell, and Mr. Pratt. 



The Buenos Aires Sailors' Home and Harbour 
Mission, 

Habitated in the Victoria Sailors' Home. 

Like many other British institutions, the Buenos Aires 
Sailors' Home had its origin in 'small things.' In 1885, 
a small group of religious men started a regular Sunday after- 
noon service for the seamen whose ships were lying in the 
Boca. A few years later, Mr. James McGowan began an 
agitation through the English press for something more tangi- 
ble. As a result of the interest aroused, the Revs. J. W. 
Fleming, Pelham Ogle, and J. H. Stockton met at the home 
of the last-named gentleman to see what could be done. 
It was resolved, that as Mr. Fleming was about to leave on 
vacation, he should visit the Rev. E. W. Matthews, of the 
British and Foreign Sailors' Friendly Society of London, 

78 




Tigre Boat Club. 



[Photo : H. G. Olds. 



and lay the facts before that Society. The result of this 
was a visit to this city by Mr. Matthews. Many of the 
senior business men still remember how this white-haired 
veteran hustled round the city pleading the cause of the 
sailors. 

At the instigation of Mr. Matthews, a public meeting 
was called on Friday, June 2yth, at the La France Hall. 
The chair was taken by H.B.M. Minister the Hon. Francis 
Pakenham. At that meeting the first Sailors' Home 
Committee was appointed, which consisted of the following 
gentlemen : Mr. T. S. Boadle, Chairman : Rev. J. W. 
Fleming, Secretary ; Don Juan Drysdale, Treasurer ; Revs. 
Pelham Ogle, J. H. Stockton; Messrs. Ronald Bridgett, 
H.B.M. Consul; S. A. Christophersen, Swedish and Nor- 

79 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

wegian Consul ; P. Christophersen, Danish Consul ; E. L. 
Baker, U.S.A. Consul; C. Ferio, German Consul; L. Van 
Riet, Dutch Minister : C. Marriott VVoodgate, and W. 
Higgins. 

This Committee issued an appeal for funds, with the 
result that $491.42 gold and $17,200.65 paper was raised. 
Thus encouraged, the Committee rented premises situated 
in Calle Pedro Mendoz.i, corner of La Madrid, in the Boca, 
and on Monday, January 26th, 1891, opened to the seamen 
of the world the international, interdenominational Buenos 
Aires Sailors' Home. At the opening ceremony Mr. T. S. 
Boadle presided, the Rev. J. W. Fleming read the Com- 
mittee's report, and Mr. E. E. Cordner moved the adoption 
of the same. 

The first Missionary-Manager of the Home was Mr. P. 
J. Walker, who served till 1893, when Mr. Fosterjohn took 
charge. He was followed by Mr. G. Chamberlain in 1898, 
who resigned in 1901, when Mr. Henry F. Fellows (who 
still holds the position) was appointed. 

From the foundation of the work the Committee had 
always seen the absolute necessity of possessing their own 
building. In 1895 they petitioned Congress for land on 
which to build. Owing chiefly to the work of Rear- 
Admiral Howard and Seftor Ricardo Pillado, the Sailors' 
Home Land Committee, and the earnest advocating through 
the press of Mr. E. T. Mulhall, the land on which the 
Victoria Sailors' Home now stands was granted. In 
the whole stretch of shipping a more suitable spot could 
not be found. 

The year 1897 was the most fruitful on record for 
philanthropic work. In that year illustrious Victoria 
completed her sixtieth year as Queen. The Britishers of 
the River Plate met to discuss how that year could be 
perpetuated. At an adjourned meeting held .it Prince 
George's Hall, on May 6th, the following resolution was 
unanimously agreed to: 'THAT AS A PERMANENT MEMO- 

80 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

RIAL OF THE AUSPICIOUS EVENT, A SAILORS' HOME FOR 

THE PORT OF BUENOS AIRES BE BUILT.' A Committee 
was appointed to carry out this resolution, consisting of the 
following gentlemen : 

The Hon. W. A. C. Barrington, (now Sir W. A. C. 

Barrington, K.C.M.G). 
Rev. J. W. Fleming, B.D. 
Messrs. A. Mackintosh, J. C. Zimmermann, R. O. 

Watson, J. F. Roberts, T. S. Boadle. 

To this number were added at different times : 

Messrs. R. Inglis Runciman, H. C. Thompson, John 
Russell, T. M. Mills, Wm. Mulhall, Juan Drysdale, 
Wm. Warden, John Dunn, Patrick Ham, Ronald 
Bridgett, F. Barrow, C. W. Mills, and E. A. Merry. 

Although it was five years from the above date ere 
the Victoria Home was opened to Sailors, the Chairman, 
Secretary, Treasurer Sir W. A. C. Barrington, Rev. J. W. 
Fleming, and Mr. R. Inglis Runciman respectively retained 
their position until they had the pleasure of seeing their 
work successfully accomplished. The building as it now 
stands, cost some $80,000. It was opened by President 
Roca, on April i6th, 1902. Not the least interesting part 
of the programme being the unveiling of a magnificent 
portrait of Her Majesty, the late Queen Victoria, a gift 
from Her Majesty to the Victoria Sailors' Home, through 
the British and Foreign Sailors' Friend Society. 

Needless to say, since the opening of the new building, 
the work of the B.A: Sailors' Home and Mission has 
increased tenfold. Concerts and Socials, which are now 
so popular with the Seamen, originated with the new Home. 
Every night since its opening, the bed-space has been 
taxed to the utmost. The number of Seamen who have 
boarded there until a berth has been procured has con- 
siderably increased. The religious side of the work has 

81 F 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

also benefited. To such an extent is this the case, that it 
is doubtful if a better attended or heartier English Service 
could be found in the City than the Sunday Evening 
Service at the Home. The Home publication, Fore and 
Aft, a readable, chatty paper of twenty pages, performs a 
useful mission. The annual Seamen's Picnic is a great 
feature. Last New Year's day no less than 1400 Seamen 
spent the whole day in the country. The following figures 
give some idea of the Work of the Home. Since the 
Home was founded until May ist, 1909, some 17,000 men 
have entered as paying boarders ; for the vast majority of 
these employment has been found. Since the inauguration 
of the present Home 48,000 free meals and 13,600 free 
beds have been given to aged and decent Seamen. The 
Home is visited by some 2000 Seaman every month. 
Thousands of books are collected and distributed. Yet 
withal the Home is still able to cany out the ideal of the 
present Management, that any genuine Seaman of any 
Nationality or Creed in need of a helping hand will most 
surely find one, at any hour of the day or night. 

The address of the Sailors' Home, or to give it its 
official name, ' The Buenos Aires Sailors' Home and Mis- 
sion,' is Calle Independencia 20, between Docks i and 2. 

The British Hospital. 

The date of the original foundation of a British Hos- 
pital in Buenos Aires is not known, but it is certain that 
such existed over sixty years ago, for old books and docu- 
ments have come to light showing that in 1850 the patients 
were removed to the new Hospital premises in Calle 
Uruguay. No trace whatever can be found as to the locality 
whence such patients were removed, so it is believed that 
prior to 1850, the Hospital was situated in rented property. 
The site in Calle Uruguay, however, was found to be un- 
suitable, for such was the bad condition of the roads that 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

in winter or after heavy rains the Hospital was quite inac- 
cessible. This led to the building of the second British 
Hospital on what was then known as Britain's Quinta, in 
Calles Bolivar and Santa Rosa, this building being opened 
in 1 86 1. Its total cost was $852,000 of the currency then 
in circulation, which was of considerably less value than 
the present day paper dollar. One half of this sum was 
derived from subscriptions received from the British public 
in Buenos Aires and the sale of the property in Calle 
Uruguay ; the other half was provided by the British 
Government, through the good offices of the then Consul, 
Mr. Frank Parish. 

The third and present British Hospital was opened by 
General Roca (then President of the Republic) in 1885, 
and, since that date, the adjoining lands have been ac- 
quired as it became necessary. At the present the property 
extends over some 1 2,000 square metres and, together with 
the buildings, has cost nearly $500,000. 

There .are 128 beds, the average daily number of patients 
being 108. The female wards can accommodate forty. 

There is a private ward containing eight beds ; and 
seven private rooms. The daily cost in the private ward is 
$8 and in the rooms from $12 to $15. 

Free admission may be obtained by application to any 
member of the Committee, providing the applicant be of 
British or American nationality, and unable to pay for 
medical treatment. 

Subscribers have the right to send in one free patient 
for every hundred dollars subscribed annually. 

The present Committee is : 

Chairman : Mr. H. H. Loveday. 

Elected Committeemen : Mr. C. H. Menzies (Treasurer), 
Mr. W. E. O. Haxell (Secretary), Messrs. R. W. 
Anderson, A. W. Boote, J. Percy Clarke, F. C. 

( Continued on p. 86. ) 
33 



THE ALBION HOTEL. 

PENSION, 

1168, Avenida de Mayo, 1168 
Buenos Aires. 

IN 
NOTED FOR MODERATE CHARGES. 



Located on the beautiful Avenida de Mayo, in the centre of the 

Business and Shopping Districts, and within walking 

distance of all the Theatres. 



Modern Heating. Electric Lights in all Rooms. 
Lift. Baths, Telephones, and all Accommodations. 

THOMAS CAVfEZEL, Proprietor. 

SPECTACLES AND EYEGLASSES 

Of every Description. 




PAT 15559-1904 



Optical Department: MURRAY'S, 501, Florida, 507, 

Under the Direction of "Mr. H. LYON (F.S.M.C. London), Qualified 
Specialist in the correct ion of defective sight. 



Cbe onlB Bnfllisb pttciane in tbc argentine. 
Sole Agents for the Patent Fairy Frameless Eyeglasses. 

Spectacles Made to Oculists' Prescriptions. 
84 




Jockey Club, Buenos Aires. [Photo: H. G.Oids. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

( Continued from p. 83. ) 

Cook, E. E. Cordner, S. N. Drysdale, E. Duggan, 
R. Grant, F. Maitland Heriot, H. H. Leng, Rymer 
O. Watson, and A. M. Wilson. 

Appointed by the Committee for the period of one 
year : 

Mr. A. Carnegie Ross, C.B., H.B.M. Consul. 

Clerical : The Rev. J. H. de Turri Croft, the Rev. 
J. W. Fleming, the Rev. Dr. McLaughlin and the 
Rev. Superior of the Passionist Fathers. 

Medical : Dr. Lovat A. Mulcahy. 

Visiting Staff. 

Dr. J. O'Conor, Dr. E. Burr, Dr. R. Halahan (Out 
Patients), Dr. G. Welchli (Eye Specialist), Dr. C. 
M. Stetson (Dental Surgeon). 

Resident Staff. 

Dr. J. Wolfe Morris and Dr. R. Nothwanger. 

Matron : Miss E. Heartnett. 

There are thirty nurses. 



The Buenos Aires Choral Union. 

Most popularly known as the B.A.C.U., the local Choral 
Union is an institution that stands out as an example of 
the results that can be achieved by perseverance and energy. 
Founded originally in 1888 in a very modest manner, the 
Union more than once came near to dying of inanition, had 
it not been for the forceful perseverance of its officials. 
Only three or four years ago it seemed to take a new lease 
of life, and so much ' push ' was shown by its staunchest 
supporters that, at the present time, it enjoys a reputation 
second to none of its kind, and even in a country where 

86 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

the prevalence of the Latin race guarantees the fact that 
music is well understood, here is a substantial and active 
confutation of the erroneous impression that the English is 
not a musical race. 

The seasons' programmes of the last three years have 
included the oratorios ' Elijah,' ' The Creation,' ' St. Paul,' 
the ' Hymn of Praise,' and ' The Messiah.' In comic 
operas, theatres have been filled to witness its representa- 
tions of ' The Geisha' and ' lolanthe.' 

It now embraces choral, orchestral, and dramatic 
sections, and most successful performances have been 
given of such plays as The Jacobites, One Summer's Day, 
In the Soup, The New Boy, Our Boys, Are You a Mason ? 
&c. 

Full particulars are obtainable at the office of the most 
popular of treasurers, Mr. A. Holder, Calle Bartolome 
Mitre 556, Office No. 48. 

At the last General Meeting the roll showed 615 mem- 
bers. The entrance fee is $10.00, with an annual sub- 
scription of $15.00. 

The Committee for 1909 is : 

President : Mr. Andreas S. Wilson. 
Vice- President : Mr. J. Hampden Wall. 
Treasurer ; Mr. A. Holder. 
Secretary : Mr. D. V. Clark. 
Properly Master : Mr. H. Waite. 

Committeemen : Messrs. W. H. H. Nicholson, Mr. 
J. S. Lee, Mr. F. F. Bideleux, and Mr. W. 
Cowlishaw. 

All new arrivals with any pretensions to social or 
dramatic talent are warmly advised to present themselves 
without delay at the ' B.A.C.U.' 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The Missions to Seamen's Institute. 

The Buenos Aires Branch of the Missions to Seamen's 
Institute has achieved great success, as such a mission 
deserves. Only established here in the last few years, 
its good work is known and appreciated to such an 
extent that not only do ladies and gentlemen in the city 
itself arrange evenings to give concerts and similar enter- 
tainments for seafaring men, but similar functions are 
organized by the residents of Belgrano, Hurlingham, and 
other outlying suburbs, the ladies and gentlemen making 
special trips into town to signify their appreciation of the 
merits of the mission and to help in practical manner the 
men who so thoroughly appreciate a little kindness in 
foreign ports. Concerts, boxing-bouts, wrestling, sing- 
songs, are given every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
night in St. John's Hall, placed at the disposal of the 
mission on these occasions by the kindness of the Rev. 
J. H. de Turri Croft, Vicar of St. John's. The Chaplain 
to the Mission is the Rev. A. P. Karney, a true and con- 
scientious worker in the great cause, and one who is as 
much respected by his friends in Buenos Aires as he is 
loved by the rough but kind-hearted men, the propagation 
of whose happiness and welfare he has made his life's 
work. 

The English Literary Society. 

Founded in 1878, the above Society is one of the 
oldest British organizations in South America. It has some 
three hundred members, and possesses well-installed read- 
ing and writing-rooms, library, &c., at No. 536 Calle 
Cangallo. The winter sessions include debates, lectures, 
fe. 

The Committee for 1909 is : 

President ; Mr. J. Monteith Drysdale. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Vice- President : Mr. R. Grant. 
Treasurer ; Mr. A. Holder. 
Librarian ; Mr. A. Stuart Pennington. 
House Stewards : Mr. E. Hildesheim and Mr. G. 
Lauder. 

Irish Orphanage for Girls. 

The above Orphanage is in Calle Gaon, Caballito. At 
the present time there are nearly two hundred inmates, 
superintended by Sisters of Mercy appointed by the Irish 
Catholic Association. It is open to orphan girls of Irish or 
Argentine-Irish parentage of the Catholic faith. 

The Women's Exchange. 

The above institution was originated here eleven years 
ago, and is for the purpose of enabling gentlewomen in 
straitened circumstances to dispose of all kinds of fancy- 
work, &c., without the identity of the vendor being dis- 
closed. The lady who sends in an article for disposal 
states the price she wants for it, and then, with 20 per cent, 
added on to this figure to defray expenses of rent, staff, and 
other outlay incidental to the upkeep of the shop, the 
object is exposed for sale. 

The shop is at No. 623 Calle Cangallo, where all kinds 
of needlework, &c., are on view, and where orders may be 
placed for home-made cakes, jams, sweets, &c. The Ex- 
change is an excellent institution, excellently carried on, 
and is deserving of patronage. 
The present Committee is : 
President : Mrs. Ackerley. 

Vice-Presidents : ist, Mrs. J. Bell; 2nd, Mrs. Wigg. 
Hon. Secretary : Mrs. A. W. Boote. 
Treasurer : Mrs. Hope Gibson. 
Manageress: Miss Forbes. 



GUIDE TO HUENOS AIRES. 



SPORTS AND ATHLETICS. 

The athlete and sportsman is always sure of a most 
hearty welcome in Buenos Aires both among the British 
and Argentine communities. Perhaps it is no exaggeration 
to say that nowhere on earth has the Englishman's love for 
outdoor games and sports spread so quickly as it has here. 
There is hardly any English sport that could be mentioned 
that has not found its ardent devotees among the native- 
born Argentine. Naturally, the degree of popularity varies 
according to the game or sport, but the two essentially 
English sports horse-racing and football are undoubtedly 
prime favourites. 

Argentine-bred racehorses are now brought to such a 
pitch of perfection that very many of them are capable of 
showing up well beside the majority of English-blood stock, 
excepting, of. course, some of the famous flyers. Nor is it 
to be wondered at that such a stage has been reached, 
considering that the Argentine breeder of racers spares 
neither trouble nor expense to bring about the best possible 
results. They are keen bidders in the English market 
when any famous horse is being sold for stud purposes, 
and, as an example, only this year the two well-known 
horses, Cyllene and Polar Star, were added to one of the 
Republic's most famous studs. 

Racing, although not carried on almost every day, as 
is the case in England during the flat-racing season, is an 
exceedingly popular pastime, and, as the racecourses are all 
within easy reach of the centre of the capital, the meetings 
are invariably well frequented. 

The totalisator system being in vogue, bookmakers 
are dispensed with. Notwithstanding an entirely unsub- 
stantiated rumour to the contrary, most of the racing 
is honourably conducted, and it is very seldom indeed that 

90 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

a horse's performance is inconsistent with past form 
displayed. 

The courses at Palermo and Belgrano are both devoted 
to meetings held exclusively under the auspices of the 
Jockey Club of Buenos Aires. The Lomas Jockey Club is 
superintended by the officials of the Jockey Club in that 
suburb, and the pretty private course attached to the 
Hurlingham Club are the property of that Club, though the 
Jockey Club often donates the prizes and countenances the 
meetings. 

Of those clubs devoted to athletics, the most important, 
from an English point of view, is the Belgrano Athletic 
Club. 

Belgrano Athletic Club. 

The original Belgrano A.C. was founded in 1892, and at 
that stage was a club for small hoys. Like many other 
institutions organized by juveniles whose spasmodic outburst 
of enthusiasm usually flickers out in a very short while, the 
Belgrano A.C. pined away from sheer lack of any reason for 
living. In 1894, a dozen young athletes, cricketers and 
footballers founded the St. Lawrence Athletic Club for the 
purpose of popularising the games of cricket and football, and 
in 1896 took over the disused name of Belgrano A.C. playing 
on the old Polo field in Coghlan. About this time, the 
Rosario Railway Club flourished in the same neighbourhood, 
its promoters all being men of more mature age and wider 
experience than those of the Belgrano A.C., and as the 
latter organization was confronted with the problem ol 
financial difficulties, the idea of amalgamating the two was 
mooted and put into execution in 1897. At this time the 
ground used was that belonging to the Rosario Railway 
Company in Belgrano, the President of the Club being the 
Manager of the Railway. From that period the Club has 
never looked back, year after year only adding to its 

9 1 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

popularity and success. It now has just on five hundred 
members, is the Champion Club in football and cricket, and 
this year beat the Cinco Esquinas Lawn Tennis Club, 
hitherto the best. Hockey was first started by the Belgrano 
A.C. last year, and in addition to the small field used for 
that game, the Club owns a large field for cricket and foot- 
ball, seven brickdust tennis courts, a grand stand, ladies' 
pavilion, gentlemen's pavilion, tea-stand, club-house, &c. 

It became a limited liability company owning its own 
ground in 1906. Its present liabilities are some $50,000, 
but as its properties are valued at $200,000, it will be seen 
that its financial success is as great as that attained in the 
playing fields. 

It is possessed of a very hard-working, energetic and 
enterprising committee, and has justly gained a great 
reputation for the organization of social festivities, the dance 
of the B.A.C. being looked forward to in the season with 
the liveliest anticipation. 

At the time this book is being compiled (April 1909), it 
has been announced that owing to the round 500 total of 
membership being likely to be passed, a meeting will shortly 
be called to discuss the question of increasing entrance fees 
and subscriptions. The Hon. Secretary is Mr. G. D. 
Ferguson, Calle Bartolome Mitre 544. 

Hurlingham Club. 

Of all the English sporting and athletic clubs in Buenos 
Aires, by far the most ambitious is the Hurlingham Club, 
with grounds and buildings in the suburb of Hurlingham 
on the Pacific Railway, and a train journey of thirty-six 
minutes from Retire Station. 

Founded in November, 1888, as a Limited Liability 
Company with an authorised capital of $200,000, of which 
$167,000 was subscribed: the object of the club was to 
encourage outdoor athletics of all kinds, particularly 

92 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

amateur jockeyship and polo. The Club started with a rough- 
and-ready racecourse, a polo-field, cricket and football 
fields, racquet and bat-fives courts, stables, &c., and achieved 
such immense popularity that in 1894 the Club House was 
built, the course amplified and laid out and additions made 
to the pavilions, stables and other buildings. The first 
race-meeting proper was held on the Club's course on May 
7th, 1891, and such was the progress made in this direction, 
that in 1904 the Jockey Club forwarded a letter signed by 
the President, authorising the Hurlingham Club to hold 
races under the auspices of that all-powerful sporting 
institution. 

The distance of one lap is about 1830 metres, and about 
ten meetings are held yearly, flat-racing and steeple-chasing 
both forming part of the programme. Gymkhanas, field- 
days, polo matches, &c., are also of frequent occurrence, 
whilst, since 1905, the most important cricket match of the 
season, North versus South, is played at Hurlingham. 

The charge for admission to all parts of the course on 
race days is exceedingly moderate, and as visitors can 
thoroughly rely upon good company and good sport in a 
delightfully pretty spot, the new arrival is cordially re- 
commended to note down the dates of the Hurlingham 
races on his memorandum tablet. 

The first Committee, at the foundation of the Club, was 
composed of Messrs. John Campbell, John Drysdale, John 
Ravenscroft, H. Scott Robson, John Drysdale, Jun., B. W. 
Gardom and B. Methuen, the President being Mr. John 
Campbell, and the Secretary, Mr. John Ravenscroft. Most 
of these gentlemen are well-known figures in the social world 
of Buenos Aires at the present day. 

The present Committee is as follows: 

President : Mr. M G. Fortune. 
Vice^President-: Mr. J. N. Drysdale, 
( Continued on p. 96. ) 
93 



THE ROYAL HOTEL. 




CORRIENTES, 782, CORNER OF ESMERALDA, 
BUENOS AIRES. 



The Most Fashionable 
Hotel in the 
City. 




Steam Heating in all 
the Rooms. 
Polite Attention. 


L. Schafer, Proprietor. 



The 
Brunswick Restaurant, 

387 BARTOLOME MITRE. 

The only English Restaurant in Buenos Aires. 

L. Schafer & A. Sougnac. 

The Royal Keller 

(Under the Royal Hotel). 

Restaurant and Grill Room. jt Ladies Orchestra. 
Concert every Night up to 1 a.m. 

L. Schafer & C. Grandjean. 

94 




Tigre Hotel, Tigre, Buenos Aires. \.Photo: A. w. B. &> Co. 



DANNEMANN 

CIGARS 



are the 

BEST ! 



Convince 
yourself ! 



Sole Importers in the Argentine 
Republic : 

VAN HULSTEYN, VOCKE & CO. 
Reconquista, 459, Buenos Aires. 

95 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

( Continued from /. 93. ) 
Secretary : Mr. A. S. Willes (Calle San Martin 333 

and 121). 

Treasurer: Mr. H. C. Ehlert. 
Committeemen : Messrs. J. K. Cassels, B. \V. Gardom 

and R. A. Sumner. 
Syndic: Mr. V. G. G. Scroggie. 
Manager : Mr. T. H. Power. 

The entrance fee is $100, with an annual subscription 
of $50 for town members, and 820 for camp members, 
Lady members are charged half the ordinary subscription 
and no entrance fee, and members of the Diplomatic Corps 
are also immune from the payment of entrance fee. 

The residential quarters of the Club are within the 
grounds, and members may obtain full board and lodging 
from 8130 to 8190 monthly. 

San Isidro Athletic Club. 

The Club was founded in 1902, starting with a member- 
ship of thirty-five, and so rapidly has it made progress that 
some four hundred members now wear its colours. Cricket 
and football constitute the chief causes of its raison d'etre, in 
both of which games it has shown itself well to the fore. 

Within the last few seasons the San Isidro A.C. has won 
the Junior Football trophy three times in succession ; twice 
has it captured the Junior Football Championship, three 
times the Second Division Cricket Championship, and also 
gained the Hockey Championship in its first season (1908). 

The entrance fee is 85 and the subscription i monthly. 

Its officials are : 

President: F. R. Guppy. 
Vice- President : H. Torre. 
2nd Vice-President : Dr. Rafael Cullen. 
96 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES 

Secretary : J. O. Gil. 
Treasurer: S. Kunz. 

Committee: Messrs. H. J. Vernet, E. Iglesias, L. 
Vernet Amedeo and L. Valle. 

The Club's grounds are in the pretty suburb of San 
Isidro, not more than five minutes' walk from the station, 
which is reached in about half an hour by train from Retire 
Station. 

GOLF. 

La Compania Terrenes de Golf en San Martin. 

The above company is still known as the Buenos Aires 
Golf Club, although this Club has ceased to exis 1 , having 
been liquidated at the end of last year. The Company was 
formed to carry on the Club and also to secure it on a 
sound financial basis, the members being shareholders in 
the Company itself. The links are at San Martin, a few 
minutes' walk from the station (Central Argentine and 
Rosario Railway). The course is of eighteen holes, and 
the Championship of the River Plate is always played here. 
The entrance fee for gentlemen is $200 in cash and- one 
share of the face value of $100 ; the subscription is fSo 
yearly, payable quarterly in advance for Town Members, 
and $35 for Camp Members. 

The Committee consists of: 
President: Mr. Victor Negri. 
Directors: Messrs. B. W. Gardom, S. Carlisle, G. H. 

Weyand, J. Marjoribanks, H. C. Bocquet. 
Substitutes : Messrs. H. M. Bucknall, W. A. Harper, 

and H. H. Leng. 
Syndic: Mr. J. Marjoribanks. 
Hon. Secretary : Mr. G. H. Weyand. 
Secretary and Treasurer : Mr. A. C. Woolmer (144 
Maipii, Buenos Aires). 

97 G 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Quilmes Golf Club. 

Committee, 1909. 
President : P. A. Grassick. 
Vice-President : Ddmaso del Campo. 
Cnptain : C. H. Gavin. 
Honorary Treasurer : J. Y. Stanfield. 
Honorary Secretary : F. K. Cassels, Calle Sarmiento, 

Quilmes, F.C.S. 
Members: R. Cooper, W. Leslie, W. C. Paterson, 

W. Pritchard. 

Links at Bernal, accessible by Southern Railway to 
Bernal Station, and by electric tramway, Buenos Aires to 
Quilmes, which skirts the ground. A sporting nine-hole 
course, 2800 yards long. Entrance fee, 850 ; lady and junior 
members, $15 annual subscription without entrance fee. 

YACHTING. 

Mention has already been made of the kindly manner 
in which the Argentine men have taken to all kinds of out- 
door sport, and the aquatic section has been by no means 
neglected, as witness the many rowing and yachting clubs 
in existence. Prominent among these and ranking first in 
point of importance is the 

Yacht Club Argentine. 

Founded as far back as 1882 by only eight yachtsmen, 
it now has three hundred members and is one of the most 
influential bodies in the Argentine world of sport The 
entrance fee is $100 and the annual subscription 60. 
The headquarters and boathouses are on the further side of 
the South Tjarsena, the Secretary's office being in Calle 
Florida 659. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The Club possesses twenty-five sailing yachts and forty 
odd motor and steam yachts, the Commodore being Dr. 
Benito Villanueva. It is permitted to fly the national flag 
as its colours, with a golden sun appearing on the white 
stripe. 

The Committee consists of: 

Vice- Commodore : Mr. Alberto de Bary. 
Secretary : Dr. Guillermo Rojo. 
Treasurer: Mr. Robert D. Zimmermann. 
Committee : Messrs. Aaron de Anchorena, Geo. L. S. 
* Wood, and Dr. George Casares. 

Sailing Regattas Committee : 
Messrs. C. F. Blanco, F. Mangold, and Lieut. A. 

Celery. 

Siibstitiites : Messrs. E. G. Manigot, Dunciin Black, 
and L. Argerich. 

Motor Regattas Committee : 
Messrs. H. Mackinlay, P. L. Obligado, and E. F. 

Newbery. 
Substitutes : Lieut.-Col. E. Vega, Mr. E. Schiinemann, 

and Mr. B. E. Hueyo. 

Measuring Committees : 
Sailing Yachts ; Dr. Pedro Pano, Mr. E. G. Manigot, 

and Mr. A. Soley. 
Motor Yachts : Messrs. C. Irmacher, C. J. W. Daw- 

ney, and C. H. Quirk. 

Another eminently successful yacht club, which although 
not so powerful as the first mentioned, bids fair to achieve 
even greater popularity, is the 

99 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Yacht Club Rio del Plata. 

Only established last year, it started its career with 
the names of 150 members on the roll. The head- 
quarters are at Canal San Fernando, an ideal spot for it, 
being situated right at the mouth of the Lujan River and 
reached by half an hour's railway journey from Retire 
Station. The entrance fee is $50 and the annual sub- 
scription 820. 

Commodore: Mr. Carlos P. Hardy. 
Vice-Commodore : Mr. Evelyn Rix. 
Secretary : Mr. Joe H. Gowa, Casilla de Correo i, 

For the benefit of yachtsmen who visit Montevideo, it 
may be here added that a very good club exists there in the 
shape of the 

Yacht Club Uruguayo. 

with headquarters in Montevideo Bay. This Club also was 
only started last year, and further particulars are obtainable 
by application to the Secretary, Mr. Diego S. Brown, 
Calle Zeballa i, Montevideo. 

Tigre Sailing Club. 

The last report issued by this very favourite and 
important organization shows that it possesses more than 
two hundred members, who display an enthusiastic in- 
terest in the pastime. Only some four years old, the Club 
has within that short space of time attained to a very 
exalted position among similar societies, and there is every 
likelihood of its continuation along the road of success and 
prosperity. 

In all, it owns a fleet of more than fifty craft, including 
1 8 Motor Boats, 12 Colleens, and a number of Sloops, 
Cutters, Dingheys, &c. 

zoo 



GtJlDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The entrance fee is $100 and the six-monthly sub' 
scription $15. Headquarters are at the Tigre, close to the 
station. Reached by train from Retiro. 

Its officers are the following : 
Commodore : Dr. Alberto V. Lopez. 
Vice-Commodore: Mr. D. H. Nye. 
Treasurer : A. N. Linares. 
Secretary : T. A. Owen, Office No. i Bolsa, Buenos 

Aires. 

Committee: Mr. Ramon de Oliveira Cezar, Mr. Juan 
S. Lea, and Dr. Alberto Hueyo. 

Regattas Committee : 

Sr. Remon de Oliveira Cezar (President), Mr. T. A. 
Owen, and Mr. A. C. Williams. 



ROWING. 

In the delightfully pretty suburb know as Tigre, where 
the Lujan and Tigre Rivers join, the boating club which 
holds most interest for the English visitor is the 



Tigre Boat Club. 

A purely English institution established thirteen years 
ago and started on a very modest scale, it rapidly- 
increased in popularity and importance and has been 
eminently successful at local regattas. At the present time 
its membership roll shows that it possesses 400 members. 
Its headquarters are at Tigre, within a few minutes' walk 
of the Tigre Hotel. It owns sixteen racing boats, eighty 
or more pleasure crafts, and half a dozen canoes. The 
boathouse is commodious and very well equipped ; lockers, 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

dressing-rooms, &c., all being well fitted. The entrance fee 
is fixed at 100 with a subscription of $25 every six months, 

President: Mr. W. E. O. Haxell. 

Vice-Prfsident : Mr. H. W. Krabbe. 

Secretary : Mr. M. A. Tranmar, Calle Reconquista 420, 
Buenos Aires. 



HOSPITAL SERVICE (Asistencia Publica}. 

Of all the modern and up-to date institutions of which 
Buenos Aires can boast, not one among them all does her 
as much credit as her splendid hospital system, or rather, 
that part of it known here as the Asistencia Publica. No 
capital in Europe can pride itself on a more perfect system 
for giving first aid in all emergencies, be it accident, fever, or 
a sudden attack of any illness whatever. The Central De- 
partment is at Calle Esmeralda 22, and here a most efficient 
staff of doctors, students, and attendants is on duty at all 
hours of the night and day. 

No ' letters of recommendation ' are necessary ; no 
1 proof of poverty ' or any other absurd conditions are im- 
posed. It is sufficient that a case requires treatment, and 
that the Asistencia Publica is called on to give the required 
aid. No payment is taken, even from the richest in the 
land, for any first services rendered. Of course, those who 
are in a position to retain the services of a professional man 
are requested to do so after the first aid is given, but where 
the patient is in a position that prevents him engaging the 
services of private practitioners, treatment is meted out as 
long as is necessary. 

In cases of accident, communication is at once made to 
headquarters, either by telephonic communication or by means 
of a series of police-calls whistled from one beat to another, 
and either motor or horse-ambulances are sent to the scene of 

102 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 




[Photo : E. C. Moody. 

Rocking Stone, Tandil. 

Reached by train front Plaza Constitution, Great Southern Railway. 



I0 3 



GUlt)E TO BUENOS AIRES. 

the mishap immediately. These ambulances are always kept 
in readiness, horses harnessed, and every possible equip- 
ment inside the vehicle. Bandages, instruments, chloroform 
and other medicaments are all in the ambulance cart, and 
not a moment is lost before it is on the spot where its ser- 
vices are required. When a case of fever occurs, ambulances 
of a different type are dispatched : the case is taken to the 
proper quarters, where it is decided whether isolation is 
essential or not, and if isolation is considered necessary, 
the patient is removed until all traces of infection have 
disappeared. 

When summoned by telephone, inquiries are made from 
headquarters as to whether the case is one of urgency, 
whether it is accident or illness, and, if an accident, whether 
the injuries are caused by a fall, burn, assault or other cause, 
different surgeons being sent to attend the case according to 
its nature. A more practical, useful, and impartial institu- 
tion it would be impossible to imagine, and, to their credit 
be it said, every resident in Buenos Aires quickly learns to 
understand the good work done by the Asistencia Piiblica. 
Their vans and ambulances are all fitted with a peculiar 
toned gong, every vehicle except those belonging to the 
Fire Brigade making way before the sound of the well- 
known bell. 

After receiving first aid at the Asistencia Piiblica, the 
more serious cases are sent to the various hospitals in the 
city, and thus, in the case of accidents, there is never the 
cry of 'no room * as is often the case in other great cities. 
At every fire of any importance, Asistencia Piiblica 
ambulances are seen waiting just behind the fire engines. 
When news of a railway accident comes to hand, they 
are at once sent to the terminal station of the line 
whereon the accident took place ; and, in fact, everywhere 
they are wanted these fast-travelling, rubber-tyred, and 
neatly painted vehicles emblazoned with the green cross, 
seem to be in waiting. The efficient and unostentatious 

104 



GtJiDE TO BUENOS AIRKS. 

manner in which the officials of this wonderful institu- 
tion go about their errand of mercy would be a good 
example to follow all over the world. 

HOTELS. 

A few of the most comfortable hotels, where English 
and American visitors will be placed at their ease, are : 
The Palace Hotel, corner of Calle Cangallo and 25 de 

Mayo. 

The Grand Hotel, corner of Calle Florida and Rivadavia. 
The Royal Hotel, corner of Calle Esmeralda and Cor- 

rientes. 

The Chester Hotel, Avenida de Mayo 586. 
The Albion Hotel, Avenida de Mayo 1168. 
The Garden Hotel, Calle Callao 950. 
The Londres Hotel, Plaza Mayo, corner of Defensa. 
Plaza Hotel, Florida and Charcas. 
The Phoenix Hotel, Calle San Martin 780. 
The Metropole Hotel, Avenida de Mayo 1207. 
The Splendid Hotel, Avenida de Mayo noo. 
The Casjtilla Hotel, Avenida de Mayo 1120. 
Caviezel's Hotel, corner of Avenida de Mayo and Calle 

Tacuari. 
The Provence Hotel, Cangallo 319. 

RESTAURANTS. 

Besides the many city restaurants mainly frequented by 
business men in town, there are quite a number where good 
meals may be obtained both in the daytime and evening, 
and amongst those that may be recommended are : 

The Brunswick, Bartolome Mitre 369, 387. 
The Royal Keller, corner of Esmeralda and 

Corrientes. 
The Bier Convent, corner of Maipii and Cuyo. 



GUIDE tO 6UENOS 

Charpentier's, Calle Florida 251. 
The Sportsjnan, Calle Florida. 
Bias Mango, Calle Florida. 
Aue's Keller, Bartolome Mitre. 

THE SUBURBS. 

Naturally enough, the visitor to Buenos Aires, as to any 
other city, wants to see as much as he can of it with the 
smallest possible inconvenience, and for this reason, no 
doubt, would like to be informed as to a few drives he 
might take with advantage. Truth to tell, however, the 
pleasantest drive in the city is to drive out of it. Paradoxical 
as this statement may seem, it is none the less true, and the 
reason is not far to seek. The narrowness of the city 
thoroughfares makes driving through the metropolis an 
extremely slow and tedious business, and, therefore, as 
broad roads unhampered by excessive vehicular traffic are 
only to be found outside the centre of the town, it is 
literally true that the best drive in the city is out of it. 
A delightful couple of hours may be spent by taking an 
open victoria along the stately Avenida de Mayo and thence 
via Calle Callao, Avenida Quintana, and Avenida General 
Alvear to Palermo, going along the beautiful avenue of 
palms in Palermo Park (see illustrations, pages 109 and 
135) as far as the railway. A pause for refreshments can 
be made at the Pabellon de Los Lagos, a well-appointed 
cafe situated in most picturesque surroundings on the banks 
of a lake or lagoon (as its name implies), and where a good 
orchestra is in attendance throughout the summer months. 

To those more deeply interested in tangible proof of the 
city's progress and prosperity than the natural beauties of 
its outlying districts, a drive from the North Darsena right 
along as far as the South Dock and the Riachuelo may give 
some idea of the vast extent of the wharves and ware- 
houses. Such a drive undoubtedly would have many points 

106 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

of interest, but few, if any, of beauty, more especially as 
the warehouses prevent the carriage skirting the water-side 
most of the way. 

The drive out to Belgrano, one of the most fashionable 
and populous of Buenos Aires suburbs, conveys a very fair 
idea of the vast extent of the metropolis, but, once beyond 
Palermo and the racecourse, there is very little to see until 
Belgrano itself is reached, where the scenery, in parts, is 
pretty. 

Such a thing as a ' country-drive,' as known in England, 
is not possible here owing to the state of the roads, which, 
once the confines of the city and the immediate suburbs 
are passed, are in a somewhat primitive condition : very 
rough and uneven, inches thick in dust in summer and 
almost impassable by reason of the mud in winter. Bullock 
waggons and great carts, drawn by powerful teams of horses 
and mules, of course make use of them for the purpose of 
bringing market produce into the city, but the roads are not 
such as would induce the owner of a light dog-cart to drive 
along them for pleasure. 

The principal suburbs are Belgrano, Flores, Banfield, 
Floresta, Quilmes, Lomas, San Martin, Adrogue, Temperley, 
and San Isidro. 

Belgrano is about eight miles from town, and is splen- 
didly served by both train and tram services. There are 
two stations, the one formerly belonging to the Central 
Argentine Railway and the one owned by the Rosario Rail- 
way. Since these two companies united forces some two 
years ago the stations, naturally, have become the joint 
property of the amalgamated concern. Facing the Central 
station at Belgrano is the Barranca, a prettily laid-out and 
terraced open space much frequented by the residents of 
the suburb, and where a police band occasionally gives 
selections. The electric tramcar service from the city to 
Belgrano continues night and day, and is one of the best- 
served routes on the whole system. 

107 



GtflDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

As a residental quarter, Belgrano is in great favour by 
reason of its healthy position and the facilities which it 
possesses for a quick journey to and from the city. The 
train's take from twelve to sixteen minutes to cover the 
distance and the tramcars from forty minutes to an hour, 
according to the route taken. Rents have risen in pro- 
portion to the increasing demand for house accommodation, 
with the result that in the best parts of the suburb not even 
a small five-roomed house is obtainable at less than about 
8150 per month. There is a very large proportion of 
foreign residents in Belgrano, these being principally 
English and German. Socially, there is no reason to 
complain of any lack of enjoyment, for in addition to a 
constant series of private social functions held during the 
season, other gatherings of a public or semi-private nature 
are very frequently organized, and result in dances, con- 
certs, &c., taking place in one or other of the two Italian 
Halls which the suburb boasts (generally in that situated in 
the Calle Moldes), and concerts are always given for 
various purposes in the Parish Room of St. Saviour's 
Church. In addition to the Belgrano Atheletic Club, full 
particulars of which will be found elsewhere in this book, 
there is a Ladies' Mandoline Club and a Literary and 
Debating Society, which meets twice a month in the Parish 
Room. Those residing in Belgrano who wish to do some 
* shopping ' but have not the necessary time to go into 
town, will find some very good shops of almost all kinds in 
Belgrano's main street, Calle Cabildo. 

Lomas. 

Some of the most popular residential suburbs surround- 
ing Buenos Aires are those on the Southern Railway, chief 
among them being Lomas, a progressive and go ahead 
little township reached by train from Plaza Constitucion 
Station in from eighteen to twenty-fi/e minut s : its princi- 

108 




Palermo Park, Buenos Aires. 



Photo: H.G.OUs. 



pal thoroughfare, Avenida Meeks, shows some beautiful 
houses, many prominent Argentine families having their 
homes there. It possesses both an Athletic and a Golf 
Club, the former having carried off the Junior League 
Football cup for two years. 

It possesses a very fine hall for dances, concerts, and 
similar entertainments, this building being known as the 
Barker Memorial Hall, erected on land next to the railway 
station, in memory of a former chairman of ihe Southern 
Railway. 

In Lomas Plaza a band plays every Thursday. 

Banfield. 

Quite close to Lomas and not quite so far away from the 
city is the pretty little suburb of Banfield, very popular with 

109 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

English-speaking people. Rents are by no means inflated, 
and the place is picturesque and healthy. The Gascon 
Lawn Tennis Club flourishes here, their courts being quite 
near the station. Both Banfield and Lomas are accessible 
by tramcar, Car No. 102 making the journey out to the 
latter in about an hour and a quarter from the Pla/.a Colon. 
The train journey to Banfield is twenty-five minutes by 
ordinary, and fifteen by express. 

Flores and Floresta. 

Both these suburbs lie in the west of the city, trams and 
trains both running to them. Rents rule far cheaper than 
in most others of the city's suburbs, and the cost of living 
is by no means high. They are both very healthy, but the 
scenery of Floresta cannot be enthusiastically praised, 
being for the most part flat and uninteresting. Flore., 
on the other hand, although flat, has a very attractive 
appearance, on account of its grove-like streets and its great 
number of palatial mansions, which always attract attention. 

Quilmes. 

This suburb is one of the prettiest, and unlike 
most others, possesses the distinction of being, to a 
certain extent, hilly. It is very up to-date and pro- 
gressive in all things, and contains a large proportion 
of English residents. These latter have formed a very 
successful Musical and Dramatic Society, which during 
the season gives a number of entertainments in the 
Quilmes Municipal Hall. There is also a Quilmes Athletic 
Club and a Tennis Club in addition to the Golf Club, 
particulars of which will be found elsewhere in this book. 
Quilmes may also be described as the educational suburb, 
for, besides St. George's College, with its splendid grounds, 
and Quilmes High School for Girls, there are St. 
Katharine's Boarding School for Girls and Mr. J. N. 

no 




Entrance to Government House. {Phots : H. G. Olds. 

Broughton's Day School for Boys. The residents of 
Quilmes also enjoy the possession of a fine beach by the 
river, from which good bathing and boating are to be had. 
The suburb is reached in about half an hour by train from 
Casa Armarilla Station (Southern Railway). The Protestant 
Association of Quilmes is composed as follows: 
President : Mr. R. N. Clark. 
Vice- President : Mr. James Dey. 
Hon. Treasurtr : Mr. R. Norris Clark. 
Hon. Secretary : Mr. H. J. Marrs, Calle Rivadavia 

519, Quilmes. 

Members : Messrs. E. Clarke, P. A. Grassick, A. A. 
Macbeth, A. Mackill, and A. Paterson. 
in 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Baths. 

Considering its modernity in other respects, Buenos Aires 
is singularly poor in bathing institutions, there are, in fact, 
only three public baths in the whole city and these are of 
the ablutionary variety, none of them being swimming- 
baths. They are at Calle Cordoba 2222, Calle Caseros 
768, and Calle French 2459. The only swimming-bath in 
the city is that of F. Souritz and is in Calle Balcarce 270. 
Very fair Turkish baths are those at Calle Suipacha 80. 

Markets. 

There are more than forty markets in the city, differing 
very little from each other except in size. Nearly all 
' shopping ' is done by the housewife at the nearest market, 
such establishments as butcher's shops, greengrocers, poul- 
terers, fruit shops and fishmongers' shops being unknown 
except here. The custom of ' haggling ' and ' bating down ' 
is universal, and so the aver.ige tradesman is generally a 
model of impudent independence, far different in his de- 
meanour towards his customers and in his desire to please 
than his English or American confrere. 

Open Spaces. 

The municipal records show more than eighty parks, 
open spaces, and plazas, the most worthy of a visit among 
the last-named being Plazas Alvear, San Martin, Libertad, 
and Lavalle, all of them being pretty and containing a 
number of statues and monuments. Plazas Constitucion 
and Once, besides being tastefully laid out, are important 
by reason of the great stations to which they are the 
approaches. , 

Libraries. 

A good English circulating library is to be found at 
Mitchell's Bookstore, Cangallo 580. 

112 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

PLACES TO VISIT. 

Before leaving the Argentine, all those visitors who have 
any time to spare should undoubtedly pay a visit to the 
beautiful Cordoba Hills. 

Cordoba itself is a small town. The most interesting 
buildings are the Cabildo and Cathedral in the principal 
Plaza, and the Observatory, at a height of over 100 feet 
above the city to the S.W. Leaving there, a few hours' 
journey brings the traveller to the beginning of the Sierra 
de Cordoba (see illustration, page 165). Entering a 
picturesque mountain gorge with a beautiful clear stream, 
in which the trout may almost be seen disporting them- 
selves, the railway gradually rises, both sides being covered 
with timber. After several miles of this the gorge suddenly 
ceases, the train then running along the side of a mountain 
lake two miles in length and about a mile across. To the 
left of the traveller open country is to be seen, while to the 
right rises the Sierra de Cordoba range, averaging about 
3000 feet in height. The traveller may assuage the pangs 
of hunger at Cosquin, where there is a railway tavern. 
There is also (a little further on the line), at Capo de Monte, 
a small hotel, where a few days may be enjoyably passed. 

Another trip, only requiring a few hours all told, is to the 
town of La Plata (Southern Railway). Originally intended 
to become the capital, it has Parliament Houses, and a 
proper town is laid out, but the Argentine leaders failing to 
patronise it, it is practically deserted. One special feature 
about it is its beautiful park in which is a fine plantation of 
oak trees, these kings of the forest being rarely met with 
here. There is also a very handsome museum, most 
picturesquely situated, where a pleasant hour can be passed, 

A visit to the Entre Rios Country should not be missed, 
the Falls of Iguazu (see page 155) in the Province of Misiones 
more than repaying the traveller. The falls are situated at 
the junction of three Republics Brazil, Paraguay, and 

113 H 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Argentina and are the mightiest in the world, far sur- 
passing in area and volume of water the better-known 
cascades of Niagara, and within about a fortnight's journey 
of Buenos Aires. The way lies by one of the Mihanovich 
steamers past Martin Garcia and Rosario to La Paz, then 
on through many winding channels to Corrientes ; or by 
the Entre Rios Railway to Concordia and on to Monte 
Caseros, whence the North-East Argentine Railway takes 
one to Corrientes, the point of embarkation on the River 
steamer. Last year the Entre Rios Railway inaugurated a 
service of trains carrying ferry-boats across the river from 
Zarate over to Ibicuy, so that when desired the journey 
can be considerably shortened. 

Still another journey that will well repay the traveller 
is to Mendoza, the great vineyard of Argentina. Here there 
are thousand of acres of beautiful, regularly laid out, and 
smartly kept vineyards, which are irrigated by the trenches 
between the rows, planted about six feet apart. Mendoza 
itself is built with low houses, as a slight preventative 
against the terrible damage done by earthquakes, which are 
always to be dreaded here. 

Visitors desirous of crossing over to Montevideo should 
make early application to the offices of Messrs. Mihanovich, 
at the corner of Calle Cangallo and 25 de Mayo, so as to 
ensure securing a well-situated berth. The River Steamers 
leave twice daily from the South Darsena Dock. 

When the stir and bustle of town life brings desire for a 
few days' peace and quiet not too far removed from the city 
itself, no better plan can be adopted than to book passage 
for Colonia, a pretty little spot in the neighbouring republic 
of Uruguay and about three hours' journey by steamer. 
Living is cheap there, and in addition to some very pretty 
drives, there is good bathing and boating. All particulars 
are obtainable at Mihanovich's office. 

The only Argentine sea-bathing resort is Mar del Plata 
which is situated on the coast of the Atlantic, at about 

114 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AtRfiS. 

250 miles from the City of Buenos Aires. The number olf 
visitors becomes more numerous every year. This is due 
to the many attractions, such as Golf, Horse-racing, Pigeon- 
shooting, Roulette, &c. 

The train service (Southern Railway) is capital, there 
being express trains every evening during the season. 

There are many splendid hotels. At the Bristol, which 
is the largest, balls and concerts are very often given. 

Amongst the places of interest is the Lighthouse at 
Morgotes. The light is a flash at intervals of a minute, 
which can be seen from a ship twenty-one miles away. 

Another place well worth visiting is Tandil. Not that 
the town itself is interesting, but its surroundings. For 
instance, at 3! miles away we have the Tandil Rocking- 
stone (see illustration, page 103), which has the shape of 
an irregular cone, with a diameter of 16 feet and a height 
of 12^ feet. This rock is so wonderfully balanced on the 
edge of a slope that with the slightest touch it will rock 
backwards and forwards. Tandil, which is 245 miles from 
Buenos Aires, is reached by the Southern Railway. The 
journey takes about six hours. 



TO BRITISHERS! 

MOULD you desire to Exchange, Buy or Sell 

the gold or paper money of any country in the 
world, wend your way to the firm with the highest cre- 
dentials, the CASA VACCARO, FLORIDA 156, where your 
needs will be satisfied promptly and at the best rates 
current. 



GUIDE TO BtlEtfOS 



A SHORT HISTORY OF BUENOS AIRES 
FROM 1806. 

Although, as has been elsewhere stated, Buenos was 
founded in 1535, and was established as a city in the year 
1580, her history does not assume much importance, until 
as late as 1806, when the invasion of the English took place. 

The beginning of this enterprise was an unauthorised 
one, the chiefs being Sir Home Popham and General 
Beresford, and when the news of the seizure of Buenos 
Aires reached England, the former was recalled to undergo 
court-martial. This, however, did not deter the English 
Government from sending out a body of troops under 
General Auchmuty, with Admiral Sir C. Stirling, who super- 
seded Sir Home Popham 

Landing at Monte Video on January i8th, 1806, these 
troops engaged in a fierce fight against six thousand 
Spaniards, who were ultimately defeated, and, with a loss of 
five hundred and sixty killed and wounded, the English 
took the city on February and. At the same time, Brigadier- 
General Crawford had been dispatched with four thousand 
two hundred men to conquer Chili. It seems to have been 
the English idea that the Spaniards were so weary of their 
own badly managed home government, that they would 
welcome a change of masters, and that the appearance of 
English troops in any one of their huge colonies would be the 
signal for them to desert in a body to England. 

That this idea was an erroneous one was proved beyond 
a doubt when they were met in full battle array by the 
Spaniards, who had unanimously placed themselves under the 
control of the clever Frenchman, Linieres. Cassell, in his 
history, very truthfully remarks : ' Had the English Govern- 
ment only wished to liberate the Spanish South American 
Colonists, and to seek their recompense in the trade that 
would naturally have sprung up with them, they had only 

116 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

to support Miranda and other Spanish Revolutionists to 
have succeeded, and to have won the honour of being 
benefactors to oppressed nations. But no such liberal ideas 
animated them, and they were soon taught their folly in the 
exasperation of the colonies which they thought of winning 
so facilely.' 

The news of the recapture of Buenos Aires reached 
London in time for orders to overtake Crawford at the Cape. 
He was ordered to abandon the voyage to Chili and 
reinforce our army at Buenos Aires as speedily as possible. 
Had they only left Crawford and Auchmuty in supreme 
command, the history of Buenos Aires might have read 
very differently. The home Government, seemingly quite 
incapable of recognising genius and military ability in men 
who had only attained the rank of Brigadier, must need give 
the chief command to General Whitelocke, who seems to 
have had nothing to recommend him from a military point 
of view, save the title of ' General.' 

This title, by the way, was gained without much trouble> 
as General Whitelocke was a favourite both with the King 
and his court, which does not say much for their judgment 
as, when given a grand opportunity for distinguishing 
himself at St. Domingo some years before, he had shown the 
white feather, and should undoubtedly have been cashiered 
without hesitation. But this General was appointed to take 
command at Buenos Aires ! 

Arriving at Montevideo tow iris the end of May, and 
mustering a force of twelve thousand men, all in good 
condition, instead of providing himself with boats or rafts to 
cross the Ria Chuelo and take Buenos Aires by a brilliant 
and sudden assault, or even ascertaining that the bridge 
over which General Beresford had passed the previous June 
had been destroyed, he wandered up-country looking for a 
ford, and sent Major-General Gore with the light troops to 
seek one in another place. Gore soon found one, only .two 
miles above where the bridge had been, but Whitelocke, 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

evidently thirsting for adventure, did not wait to hear the 
result of the Major-General's search, but led his men north- 
ward through bogs and thickets to the great detriment of 
their health and spirits, and did not join forces with Gore 
until July 3rd. 

Then all hope of taking the place with a rush was futile, 
for all this time the Spaniards, mustering between fifteen 
and twenty thousand men, had been arming and placing their 
city in a state of defence. Besides the military, the whole 
male population had taken up arms, and were posted at the 
windows and on the flat roofs of the houses, while the streets 
were barricaded, and batteries of cannon placed to sweep 
them with grape-shot. 

Yet, such was the foolhardy incompetence of this most 
ungeneral-like General, that he issued orders on the 5th 
July to take the place by storm ! He furthermore com- 
manded that the three divisions under Generals Auchmuty, 
Lumley, and Crawford were to dash forward with unloaded 
muskets, trusting entirely to the bayonet, to certain buildings 
whence they could direct an attack of shot and shell on 
the Spaniards. General Auchmuty took thirty-two cannon, 
a great quantity of ammunition, and six hundred prisoners, 
making himself master of the great Bull-ring, while other 
regiments of his division succeeded in gaining possession of 
the church and convent of Santa Catalina and of the 
Residencia, a commanding post. Brigadier-General Lumley 
was not so fortunate. He headed two regiments, the 36th 
and the 88th, who advanced under a most murderous fire 
from the grape-shot in the narrow streets and musketry fire 
from windows and house-tops, with the result that the latter 
regiment was compelled to yield, while what was left of the 
former managed to join the 5th, and to reach Sir Samuel 
Auchmuty at the Bull-ring, dispersing a body of eight 
hundred Spaniards and taking two guns on their way. 

General Crawford secured the Dominican convent and 
assailed the enemy from the top of the building, but was. 

lit 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

soon compelled by showers of grape and musket shells to 
abandon this position. He had lost a great number of 
men, Major Trotter, one of his best officers was killed, and 
Colonel Parke, commanding the left division of the brigade, 
was compelled to surrender. Perceiving that firing had 
ceased, and receiving no information from Whitelocke, who, 
it subsequently transpired had kept himself in safety outside 
the place, Crawford inferred that the assault had failed and 
capitulated at 4 p.m. Linieres duly informed Whitelocke of 
the surrender of part of Lumley's division and the whole of 
Crawford's, advising him to capitulate as otherwise he could 
not be answerable for the lives of the prisoners, so great was 
the animosity of the people against the English for having 
tried to annex Buenos Aires for themselves instead of only 
aiding them to free themselves from the Spanish yoke. 
The treaty was therefore signed on July 8th by Rear- 
Admiral Murray, General Whitelocke, and Linieres, under 
the following conditions : 

' That all prisoners now made and also those taken with 
General Beresford the year before should be returned, that 
General Whitelock's army, with its stores, equipage and 
arms, should be conveyed across the La Plata to Montevideo, 
his troops to be supplied with provisions, and that at the 
end of two months the English were to surrender Monte- 
video and retire from the country. 

Thus ended the attack of England on Buenos Aires, 
a culmination which has not often happened in the former's 
history. At any race General Whitelocke was not to escape 
this time, as on the 28th January, 1807, he was court - 
martialled at Chelsea Hospital, and deservedly condemned 
to be cashiered as wholly unfit and unworthy to serve his 
King and country in any military capacity whatever. 

There is no doubt that the victory over the English was 
the death-blow to the Spanish supremacy in the River Plate, 
for the Buenos Aireans now realised their own strength. 

As a step in the right direction, L'nieres was deposed on 
119 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

January ist, 1809, and from thence, until the establishment 
of the Republic on May 25th, 1810, risings and battles 
occurred, too numerous to specify here. Although the 
independence was not formally declared till 1816, still the 
inhabitants behaved as though it had been. 

The title given to the new form of Government was 
1 The United Provinces of the River Plate.' 

The first Argentine flag was flown by General Belgrano 
in 1812. It was originated by French in 1810 by an 
accident. Wanting to distinguish his followers from the 
rest, he went to a shop and bought several pieces of ribbon, 
some pale blue, some white, and made of them favours 
which he distributed among his followers. The National 
Anthem was first heard in the year 1813. The General 
Assembly took place in Buenos Aires, when, among other 
measures, the Tribunal of the Inquisition was abolished and 
the titles of nobility also ; the arms of Spain were ordered 
to be taken down from public buildings, and the money 
was altered. 

But even then the inhabitants could not agree as to the 
form of Government they required, and revolutions were 
always taking place. 

In 1831 General Rosas succeeded in establishing the 
Federal form of government. This General, proving to be a 
tyrant in every sense of the word, reigned until 1852, when 
a revolution occurred in which he was defeated and had to 
flee from the country. In the next year (1853) a Congress 
at Santa Fe having sanctioned the ' National Constitution ' 
on the Federal system, at which the province of Buenos Aires 
did not take part, caused a civil war. 

The Province of Buenos Aires still remained indepen- 
dent, although peace was declared and signed in 1865. 

During the period from 1874 until 1880, the clearing of 
the plains of the Province of Buenos Aires of the Indians, 
who were such great and seemingly insurmountable obstacles 
to the development of agricultural industries, took place, 

I 2O 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Then, in 1880, General Roca being President, the city of 
Buenos Aires was declared the Federal Capital of the 
Republic. The last serious revolution took place in 1890, 
after which the then President, Don Miguel Juarez Celman, 
resigned. Since then there have been three new Presidents, 
the fourth, General Roca, being re-elected in 1898, and 
having held sway ever since until the late President Quintana 
was elected. He, dying in 1906, the present President, 
Dr. Figuer Alcorta was chosen by the people. There is 
probably no other country in the world that has developed 
as rapidly and improved as marvellously as the Argentine ', 
there is certainly no other city that has risen in so few 
years to the height that has this one of Buenos Aires. 



ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS 

PUBLISHED IN BUENOS AIRES. 

The Daily Standard. Subscriptions : Single copies, 
10 cents; City per month, $2.50 paper; Camp per year, 
.f3O.oo paper; Uruguay B.O. per month, $1.50 U. Gold; 
ditto per year, $13.00 U. Gold. European and American 
countries per year, ^4. 

The Weekly Standard. Composed of Sunday's and 
Thursday's papers and Mail Supplement, which appears 
every Thursday. Camp or City per year, $10.00 paper; 
European and American countries per year, 2. 

PACKET EDITION (MAIL SUPPLEMENT). Single copies, 
10 cents; European and American countries per year, 

;i 5*- 

Present owners : Messrs. M. G. and E. T. Mulhall. 
Editor: John L. Mulhall. 
Sub-Editor : E. Graham Dewey. 



GUIDE TO mjENOS AIRES. 

The Buenos Aires Herald. Offices : Callc Cor- 
ricntes 672. Subscription Rates (payable in advance). 
Daily edition (Town or Camp) Interior : Per annum, post 
free, $15.00 m/1 ; per six months, post free, 88.50 m/1; per 
three months, post free, $4.50 m/1 ; per month, post free, 
81.50 m/1. South American Republics: Per annum, 
815.00 m/1; foreign postage, 818.50 m/1 ; total, 833.50 m/1. 
Other countries in the Exterior : Per annum, post free 
($ 2s. 8//.), 816.00 gold. 

Weekly edition (Town or Camp) Interior : Yearly 
subscription, post free, 811.50; half-yearly, 87.50; three 
months, 84.50. Exterior : Yearly subscription, post free, 
$16.00 m/1 ; half-yearly, 89.00 m/1; three months, 85.00 m/1. 

Proprietor and Director : Mr. Thomas Bell. 

The Review of the River Plate. Offices : Calle 
Bartolome Mitre 475. Price 30 cents per copy ; or, by sub- 
scription, 816.00 yearly (Argentina) or \ 15*. (abroad). 

A weekly journal of general news, railway, banking, 
shipping, insurance, finance, produce, statistics, and sport. 

Present owners : Danvers, Anderson & Co. 

Edited by Ernest Danvers. 

The Southern Cross. Offices: Calle Chacabuco 178* 
Works : Calle Bartolom^ Mitre 3885. Issued weekly, 
price 20 cents per copy; or, by subscription, 810.00 yearly 
for Argentina and i for abroad. 

Devoted to the advancement of Catholicism and the 
policy of independence for the Irish people. 

Proprietor: Mr. William Bulfin. 
Editor : Mr. Gerald Foley. 

The Times of Argentina. Offices: Calle 25 de 
Mayo 268. Founded 1893. Price 20 cents per copy. 
A weekly paper, mainly devoted to information con- 
199 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

cerning shipping, railways, insurance, finance, commerce, 
and statistics. 

Proprietor : Mr. J. J. Rugeroni. 

Assistant Editor : Mr. J. J. Rugeroni, jun. 

The Hibernos: Argentine Review. Offices and 
Works : Calle Cuyo 2002. Published weekly, price 20 
cents per copy ; $8.00 per annum. 

Founded in 1906 by a group of prominent Irish and 
Irish-Argentine ladies and gentlemen to uphold and pro- 
mote Irish- Argentine unity, and to foster Catholic tra- 
ditions. 

Managing Director : Mr. Edward Finn. 

The Illustrated Review. Offices : Calle 25 de 
Mayo 268. An illustrated fortnightly publication, treating 
mainly of sports, theatres, and social items. Founded 
1896. Formerly called 77/6' Week (Rosario). Price 50 
cents per copy or $10.00 per annum. 

Owned and edited by Mr. Ernest Stanford Rugeroni. 



BRITISH EMIGRANTS. 

It cannot be too clearly pointed out that this country is 
not one for emigrants in speculative search of employment, 
the labour element being almost exclusively composed of 
Italians, who thrive and save on exceedingly small wages, 
and find their environment more or less similar to that to 
which they have been accustomed, whereas to the British 
labourer everything seems topsy-turvy and different. Again, 
the use of the Spanish language is a very great difficulty to 
English labourers. The class of British emigrant to which 
this country is suited is the one who has money to take up 



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OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

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the Republic. 

Boating & Regatta Outfits. 

ALWAYS IN STOCK. 

CASHMERE CLOTHS, COLLARS, 

TIES, BOOTS AND SHOES, etc. 

SUITS MADE TO MEASURE. 



683, CALLE ALSINA, 683 
BUENOS AIRES. 

MITCHELLS 

ENGLISH 

BOOKSTORE 

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CIRCULATING 
LIBRARY 



IS TO BK FOUND 
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(Two doors from Florida. ) 



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124 




Gaucho Dwelling, Argentine Camp. 



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a holding and work it. With the rapid development and 
opening up of the country which is in progress, this class of 
person is not only able to make a good living for himself 
and family, but also has the prospect of his lands rising in 
value as development takes place, and, with the extension 
of the railways, vast tracts of land have been opened up 
and are now purchasable. Intending settlers should, how- 
ever, take two or three years in learning the special con- 
ditions of farming^ and make full inquiry as to the rainfall, 
depth of the ground-water, nature of the soil and subsoil, 
before purchasing land. On these points information is 
obtainable at the Argentine Government Departments, the 
Meteorological Office in particular having a remarkably well- 
organized service. 

'25 



GUIDE TO BUEtfOS AIRES. 

Governesses, tutors, clerks, &c., are strongly advised not 
to go to the Republic unless they have situations to go to, 
and have contracts duly drawn up and legalised by Argen- 
tine Consuls before starting. 

All persons should bear in mind that Spanish is the 
language of the country, and to be able to talk and write in 
that tongue is essential to success. Living is extremely 
expensive in the Capital, and is unduly augmented by pro- 
vincial or municipal taxes and charges of all kinds. In 
fact, all commodities, such as English persons are ac- 
customed to think almost necessaries, owing to the cheap- 
ness of all classes of provisions and clothing in England, 
are dearer in the Argentine Republic. 

Children of British Settlers. 

All children born in the Argentine Republic are re- 
garded as Argentine citizens, and are liable to the burdens 
thereby entailed. 

Military Service. 

By an Act of 1901, military service was made obligatory 
upon all Argentine citizens, except such as are physically 
unfit, or an only son of a widowed mother. 

Class of Emigrant desired. 

The great demand is for the immigrant with some know- 
edge and capital, whose aim is to purchase uncultivated 
land, to build himself a house, plough the land and rear a 
family. Throughout the Republic there is land to be pur- 
chased at a low figure with but little preparation needed for 
farming, cattle-raising, &c. Up to now this class of im- 
migrant has been rare, as those who have arrived generally 
prefer to stay in the capital, in spite of inducements offered 
to them to go into the interior of the country. 

126 



GtJIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Wages in Dollars. 

In late years the wages given in dollars in the pamphlets 
of emigration agents in Europe have misled those intending 
to emigrate, being high in paper dollars but in reality low in 
gold. The emigrant should, before emigrating, always 
ascertain the gold value of wages in a country where paper 
is the current and legal medium of exchange, as its value is 
liable to fluctuation. 



Drawbacks to British Emigrants. 

Englishmen have to compete not merely with the native 
Argentines, but with a continuous and steady Italian 
immigration, and in less settled provinces with the native 
races, which tends further to reduce wages. Moreover, 
while the emigrant who goes to any English Colony knows 
that if he himself is exposed to hardships, the position of 
his children will be almost certainly improved by his 
exertions, the settler in the Argentine Republic has no such 
expectation. The political and social conditions around 
him are such as he can neither have part in nor understand. 
His ignorance of Spanish or any Latin language is a most 
serious disadvantage. Education, though nominally free, 
compulsory, and unsectarian, varies very greatly in the 
different localities, and in the more remote districts there is 
little or none. There is always the risk that under the new 
influences of climate and surroundings, the character may 
deteriorate. 

Advantages. 

For those, however, who have seriously considered the 
disadvantages of the Argentine, and are prepared to face 
them, who have some capital and the requisite energy and 
training to learn Spanish, and throw themselves into new 
methods of agriculture, this country has possibilities. 

127 



GtJIDE TO BUENOS AIRfcS. 



Advice to Intending Colonists. 

It is impossible in England to advise upon the merits 
of particular ' colonies.' The number of them is so great 
and the expediency of settling in any depends so much on 
the honesty and good faith of the proprietors that it is far 
better in all cases to make a careful examination on the 
spot before deciding on any purchase. If the intending 
colonist be willing to work for a year or six months in a 
district as an ordinary labourer in order to make a careful 
study of its agricultural capacities he will then be able to 
buy without much risk of buying inferior land. He must, 
however, be prepared to face agricultural conditions quite 
new to him, and to compete as a novice with southern races 
on ground with which they are familiar. 

Summary. 

From the above account it will be gathered that the 
Argentine Republic possesses no attractions to the ordinary 
British emigrant, who possesses neither any capital or skill 
in some special trade which may be wanted. 

British Representatives. 

The British Consuls and Vice-Consuls in the Argentine 
Republic are as follows, and may be applied to for infor- 
mation : 

Buenos Aires : Consul and Vice-Consul. 
Bahia Blanca (Buenos Aires Province) : Vice-Consul. 
Campana (Buenos Aires Province) : Vice-Consul. 
(iallegos (South Patagonia) : Consular Agent. 
La Plate (Buenos Aires Province) : Vice-Consul.. 
Rosario (Santa Fe Province) : Consul and Vice Consul. 
Santa Fe (Santa Fe Province) : Vice-Consul. 
Concordia (Entre Rios Province) : Vice-Consul. 
128 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Parana (Entre Rios Province) : V ice-Consul. 
Cordoba (Cordoba Province) : Vice-Consul. 
Villa Constitucidn : Vice-Consul. 
Port Madryn : Vice-Consul. 

RAILWAYS. 
Central Argentine Railway Company, Limited. 

(Ferro Carril Central Argentina). 

The above Company is formed of the Central Argentine 
Railway and the ex-Buenos Aires and Rosario Railway, the 
Argentine National Congress having sanctioned the amalga- 
mation under the title of the Central Argentine Railway. 

Capital raised by Shares and Stock. 
Consolidated Ordinary Stock ... ... 2 1,446,950 

Consolidated Preference Stock ... ... 4,304,390 

Deferred Stock ... ... ... ... 811,800 

Preference Shares, 10 each ... ... 332,090 

Total ... 26,895,230 

Obligations. 

4 percent. Rosario Debenture Stock ... ,5,500,000 

6 Central 442,305 

4 i> ., >, 733>43 2 

3i l ,in> 2 7 

4| Western Annuity ... ... 2,017,500 

Total ... ... ,9,810,444 

The London Offices are at 3A Coleman Street, E.G., 
the present Board being composed of the following: 

Directors. 

J. White Todd, Chairman. Peter Riddoch. 
Charles Darbyshire. Jason Rigby, M.I.C.E. 

Colonel F. J. G. Murray, - J. -Wilson Theobald. 
.Campbell E. Ogilvie. 

129 i 



BUENOS AIRES 



PALACE 

<3~ 

Corner of 
Calle Cangallo 




rIOCNICO NAtT 



HOTEL 



and 25 de Mayo. 




THE LEADING HOTEL 

. . IN . ;. 
SOUTH AMERICA. 



130 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Consulting Engineers. 
Sir Douglas Fox & Partners. Livesey, Son & Henderson. 

Auditors. 

Welton, Jones & Co. Deloitte, Plender, Griffiths & Co. 
F. Fighiera, Secretary. 

The Offices in Buenos Aires are in the ' Central Argen- 
tine Buildings,' at the corner of Bartolome Mitre and 25 
de Mayo. 

Local Committee and Representatives in the Argentine 
Republic. 

Dr. Jose A. Frias, President. H. H. Loveday. 
Samuel Hale Pearson. Carlos Maschwitz. 

G. P. Newell, Secretary. 

Officers. 

H. H. Loveday, General Manager. 

H. G. Cabrett, General Superintendent of the Line. 

J. A. Meelbom, Chief Accountant. 

R. N. Mackenzie, Traffic Manager. 

M. J. Elordi, Chief of Movement. 

Cabino R. Cueli, Commercial Superintendent. 

H. Pearse, Chief Mechanical Engineer. 

G. E. Morton, Traction Superintendent. 

T. G. Russell, Stores Superintendent. . 

A. McClelland, Telegraph Superintendent. 

The total length of line worked is 2363 miles of 5 ft. 6 in. 
gauge, and 29 miles of 2 ft. 6 in. gauge (the Malaguend 
Section), and the new law provides for the construction of 
the following new extensions and branches 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

From Cruz to Cordoba, and from a point near Rio 

Cuarto on the Andine Railway, in a northerly Km*. 

direction, to join up with the line Cruz to Cordoba 443 

From Las Rosas to Villa del Rosario ... ... 218 

From a point on the preceding line to Costa Sacate 190 

From Morteros to a point near Hersilia ... ... 70 

From Sastre to a point near Maria Juana ... ... 13 

From Galves to Larrechea ... ... ... ... 22 

Total approximate kilometres (about 600 miles) 956 



The Company is given power to double the line between 
Villa Ballester and Rosario, and to lay down two more lines 
between San Martin and Retire terminus, and, to allow of 
the latter doubling of the tracks, the Company is authorised 
to widen the steel viaduct running through Palermo Park, 
with which the line from Belgrano East Station will be con- 
nected, and the old line from Palermo to Retire will then 
be taken up. 

A large terminal station will be constructed at Retiro 
(Avenida Maipii and Paseo de Julio) to take the place of 
the two existing stations. 

In Rosario, an important city and port 189 miles from 
Buenos Aires, a high-level viaduct to join up the Central 
Station with the East Station is in course of construction. 

The Central Argentine Railway system serves the pro- 
vinces of Buenos Aires (North), Sante Fe, Cordoba, Santiago 
del Estero, and Tucuman, and, in combination with the 
Central Northern Government Railway, the provinces of 
Salta and Jujuy and Republic of Bolivia. The total number 
of stations opened to the public service is 300. The Com- 
pany owns large grain elevators in the Buenos Aires Docks, 
and at the Ports of Villa Constitution and Rosario has 
every facility for the shipment of produce and grain in large 
quantities. 

132 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The Great Southern Railway 

(Ferro Carril del Sud) 
Was registered on October 8th, 1862. 

Capital. 

4 per cent. Debenture Stock ... ... ... ^12,000,000 

4^ per cent. Saladillo Branch Debenture 

Stock (not negotiable) ... ... ... 1,032,930 

4^ per cent. B. A. Western Railway Annuity 

Account (Brandzen Branch) ... ... 242,600 

5 per cent. Preference Stock ......... 6,000,000 

Ordinary Stock ... ... ... ... 15,000,000 

4 per cent. Extension Shares, 1910 ... ... 6,000,000 

4 per cent. Extension Shares, 1912 ... ... 2,500,000 



The London Offices are at River Plate House, Finsbury 
Circus, London, E.G., the present Board being com- 
posed of 

Directors. 

Jason Rigby, Chairman. Col. Sir C. B. Euan Smith, 
Henry Bell. K.C.B. 

A. E. Bowen. David A. Shennan. 

Woodbine Parish. David Simson. 

H. G. Allen, London Manager and Secretary. 

The mileage of the Southern Railway's system is, single 
line 2964, through line 2740, serving 277 stations, the prin- 
cipal of which are Plaza Constitucion, Lomas, Las Flores, 
Azul, B. Blanca, La Plata, Mar del Plata, Pringles, C. Suarez, 
Pigue. 

The terminal station is situated at Plaza Constitution, 
and the Local Board, with offices at Calle Cangallo 564, is 
constituted as follows : 

G. White, M.I.C.E., Chairman. Dr. N. R. Fresco. 

J. Percy Clarke, General Manager. Sr. F. D. Guerrico. 

133 




ARGENTINE 
RAILWAY. 



HIS Railway, comprising 2390 miles of line, 
including branch lines, runs through the Provinces of Buenos 
Aires, Santa F, Cordoba, Santiago, and Tucum^n, serving 
en route the parts of Campana, San Nicolds, Villa Constitution, 
Rosario, and Santa Fe, which, with all intermediate stations, are 
served with a convenient train service, mostly night and day. The 
day trains are provided with dining-cars, and the night trains with 
commodious sleeping-cars. 

Through trains are run in combination with other Railways to 
the Western Provinces of San Luis, Mendoza, and San Juan, and 
the Northern Provinces of Salta, Catamarca, Jujuy, and the Republic 
of Bolivia, as far as La Guiaca. 



LOCAL RESORTS. 

The most popular resort near the City of Buenos Aires is con- 
sidered J~to be the Suburb of Tigre, which is known as the ' Henley 
Portena.' It is situated on the South bank of the Rio Lujan, 18 
miles distant from the City of Buenos Aires terminal station. Tigre 
is served by two branch lines, and is headquarters of several rowing, 
yachting, and sailing clubs, which hold regattas during the year. It 
is a favourite resort for holiday-makers, and, with the intermediate 
suburbs, offers exceptional advantages for residents, the localities 
being both healthy and picturesque, beside being provided with a 
splendid fast-train service. 

GOLF LINKS exist at Palermo (Golf Station), 4 miles from the 
City, and at San Andree (St. Andrew's), 1 1 miles from City, the latter 
being an iS-hole course. 

The Administration is at the corner of Calles Bartolome Mitre 
and 25 de Mayo, in Buenos Aires, where all infor- 
mation can be obtained with regard to 
passenger fares, freights, etc. 

BUENOS AIRES, 1909. 

'34 




Palermo Park, Buenos Aires. 



{Photo: H.G. Olds. 



The Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway. 

{Ferro Carril Buenos Aires al Pacified] 

Was registered in the year 1882, and has at present 
capital as follows : 

Debentures ... ... ... ^10,250,000 

2,200,000 
10,000,000 

Offices in Buenos Aires. 

Ticket and Enquiry Office, Calle 25 de Mayo 279. 
Administration, Calle 25 de Mayo 291. 
Traffic Department, Calle 25 de Mayo 277. 
Engineer's Department, Calle 25 de Mayo 277. 
Accountant's Department, Calle Florida 777. 



Preference Shares 
Ordinary Shares . . , 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Oj/ife's in London. 
Daslnvood House, 9 New Broad Street, E.G. 

Board of Directors. 

Lord St. 1 )avids ( ( *hairman\ Hon. Arthur Stanley, M.P. 
T. Penn Gaskell, M.I.C.E. F. O. Smithers (Managing 
C. E. Gunther. Director). 

Edward Norman. W. R. Cronan {Secretary). 

General Manager ^ J. A. Goudge, Calle 25 de Mayo 291. 

The mileage of the Pacific Railway system is 2648 miles, 
serving 305 stations, the terminal station being at Buenos 
Aires and the most important being Palermo, Mercedes, 
Chacabuco, Junin, Labulaye, Villa Mercedes, Mendoza, 
Bahia Blanoa, and San Juan. From November to May 
this Company run the famous ' Transcontinental Rapid ' 
Express to Chili, crossing the Continent via the Andes to 
Santiago in thirty-eight hours. The well-known baths and 
natural bridge at Puente del Inca, visited by all English 
travellers, are also on this line. 

The Local Board is constituted as follows : Dr. Emilio 
Lamarca (President), J. A. Goudge, Raul Zavalia. Offices, 
Alsina 557, Buenos Aires. 



The Buenos Aires Western Railway 

(Fcrro Cam'! Oeste dc Buenos Aires) 

Was registered in the year 1890, with a capital of 
,6, 900,000, divided as follows : 

1,000,000 Deferred Shares of 10 each 

representing ^1,000,000 

250,000 Ordinary Shares of ^10 each 

representing ... ... ... 2,500,000 

340,000 Guaranteed Shares of ^10 each 

representing ... ... ... 3,400,000 

Total ... ^6,900,000 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The London Offices are at River Plate House, Finsbury 
Circus, London, E.G. The present Board being com- 
posed of 

Directors. 

Henry Bell (Chairman}. David Simson, M. I.C. E. 

A. E. Bowen. J. White Todd. 

Woodbine Parish. F. Eustace Faithfull (Sec.). 

The mileage of the Western Railway's system is actually 
1305 miles, serving 138 stations, the principal of which are 
Haedo, Tablada, Lujan, Mercedes, Chivilcoy, Bragado, 
Trenque Lanquen, Villegas, Lincoln, America, &c. 

The terminal station is at Once, and the local Board, 
with offices at Cangallo No. 564, is constituted as follows : 

Local Representative, S. Brian, M.I.C.E. 
Manager, Alejandro F. Lertora. Secretary, W. C. Beeston. 



Cordoba Central Railway Company, Limited. 

(Incorporated i ith August, 1887). 

Share Capita/. Authorised ;i, 600,000. Issued 
; i, 1 60,000 as follows : 

First Preference Stock ^7 20,000. 
Second Preference Stock ^"120,000. 
Ordinary Stock ... ^320,000. 

Debenture Capital. Authorised ^"7,750,000. Issued 
^6,983,989, as follows : 

5 per cent. Debenture Stock Original Line authorised 
and issued ^"400,000. 

4 per cent. Consolidated Debenture Stock (Central 
Northern Section), Authorised ^3,000,000. Issued 
^2.600,000. 

137 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

5 per cent. Second Debenture Stock (Central Northern 
Section) authorised ^,'t, 200,000. Issued ^600,000. 

Income Debenture Stock (Central Northern Section) 
authorised ^3,150,000. Issued ^"3,083,989. 

The London offices are at Dashwood House, 9 New 
Broad Street, London, E.C. Secretary: N. Strzelecki. 
The present members of the Board are : 

Directors : 

E. L. Weigall, Chairman, G. W. Houghton, 
Colonel G. E. Church. Managing Director. 

Walter Henty. E. B. T. Studd. 

Philip Norman. Jacques Van Raalte. 

Mileage. Original Line (Metre Gauge) 128^ miles. 
Central Northern Section (Metre Gauge) 643^ miles. 
Total, 772 miles. 

The original line serving San Francisco and all inter- 
mediate stations to Cordoba, and Central Northern Section 
serving Cordoba and all intermediate stations northward to 
Tucuman, including a branch line from La Madrid. 

Local Board. Dr. Benito Villanueva, Dr. M. Padilla, 
D. M. Munro. 

D. M. Munro, Manager. 

Solicitors, London: Messrs. Ashurst, Morris, Crisp & Co. 



138 




Plaza Constitucion. {Photo -. A.\iv. B.&> c. 

Showing the old Sottthern Railway Station. 

The Entre Rios Railway Co., Ltd., 

(Ferro Carril de Entre Rios] was registered in the year 
1891, and its capital stands as follows : 



Description. 


Authorised. 



1,200,000 
250,000 

1,693,260 

734,049 
1,583,140 


Issued. 


Balance to 
be Issued. 


Four per cent. Debenture Stock 
Five per cent. Debentures ... 
Five percent. First Preference 
Stock 


L 
1,200,000 
250,000 

1,649,55 

734,049 
',559,585 




* 

* 
43,710 

23,555 


Four per cent. Second Prefer- 
ence Stock 
Ordinary Stock 

Totals 


5,460,449 


5,393,184 


67,265 



* Debentures or Debenture Stock can be issued up to half 
the amount of the capital of the Company for the time being 
issued, but the 4 per cent. Debenture Stock is limited to one- 
third of the Capital. 

139 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The London offices are River Plate House, Finsbury 
Circus, E.(!., the present Board being composed of: 

Directors : 

}. Rigby, M.I.C.E., Chairman, Woodbine Parish. 
Lord Farrer. Hon. R. C. Parsons. 

Col. F. G. Oldham. 

W. H. Williams, General Secretary. 

The mileage of the Entre Rios Railway system is 
656, serving 66 stations, the principal of which are : 
Zarate, Parana, Concordia, Uruguay, Gualeguaychii, 
Gualeguay, Victoria, Nogoya, Basavilbaso, Villaguay and 
Ibicuy. 

The terminal station is situated at Federico Lacroze* 
(Buenos Aires), and the Local Board, with offices at Calle 
Cangallo 564, is constituted as follows : 

L)r. Norberto Fresco, F. C. H. Chevallier Boutcll, 
Henry Darbyshire and Follett Holt. 



The Buenos Aires Midland Railway 

was registered in the year 1906, the concession being 
granted in 1904 by the Provincial Government from 
Avellaneda to Carhue, a distance of 530 kilometres. 
The construction of the line commenced on June 8th, 
1906, and the rails now reach to about the i5oth kilo- 
metre, the remaining portion of the line is now under 
construction. The gauge is one metre. The line is open 
between Puente Alsina, Fiorito, La Noria and Matanzas to 
San Sebastian, 130 kilometres. 



* This is a station belonging to the Buenos Aires Central 
Railway, over whose line the railway has running powers 
into Buenos Aires. 

140 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The capital is ^'1,500,000, divided as follows : 
Non-cumulative Preference Shares ... ^"1,000,000. 
Ordinary Shares . . ... ... 500,000. 

,1, 000,000 of 4% Debenture Stock has also been 
issued. 

The present Board consists of : 

Directors : 

Frank Henderson, Chairman. F. Eustace Faithfull. 
H. C. Allen. William Higgins. 

The local Committee consists of Messrs. F. J. Wythes, 
J. Percy Clarke, and A. F. Lertora. 

The General Manager is Mr. Wilson Jacobs, with 
offices in Calle 25 de Mayo 33. 

The London offices are in River Plate House, Finsbury 
Circus, E.G. 



SCHOOLS. 
St. George's College, Quilmes. 

This College was founded in 1898 by the Chaplain of 
St. Saviour's Belgrano (Rev. A. O. Tisdall), and the 
Chaplain of All Saints', Quilmes (Rev. J. T. Stevenson), 
supported by thirteen gentlemen who joined them as 
founders. When the College started on October ist, 1898, 
there were six boys. At the end of three years, this number 
had risen to fifty, and at the present time there are nearly 
a hundred pupils. The College was formed into a Limited 
Liability Company in 1907. 

The object of St. George's College is to provide the 
141 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

sons of English-speaking people, residing in the Argentine 
and neighbouring Republics, with a thorough education on 
the lines of an English Public School. Boarders only are 
admitted. 

The School buildings are situated on the high ground a 
mile and a quarter from the River Plate and the grounds 
surrounding and adjoining the College are eighteen acres in 
extent, including gardens, playing fields, tennis courts, 
meadows, &c. 

The School dues are $400 (paper) per term. $750 per 
term for two brothers. 81050 per term for three brothers. 

The Head Master is the Rev. Canon J. T. Stevenson. 

Address, St. George's College, Quilmes F.C.S., Argen- 
tina. 

English High School. 

The English High School, Melran and Pampa, Belgrano, 
is a college for both day scholars and boarders of both 
sexes. It has been established nearly thirty years and has 
a branch at Alvarez 2465, near corner of Santa FC*. The 
accommodation has been extended lately by erection of a 
new house built expressly for a boys' school, with all most 
recently contrived conveniences. A new swimming bath 
has been constructed. 

The Staff is a very efficient one, and includes Mr. A. 
Watson Hutton, M.A., Edinburgh ; Mr. J. Laidlaw, L.A., 
Edinburgh ; Mr. A. A. Mack, B.A., Cambridge ; Mrs. J. 
B. Joyce, ist Math., London Univ., and other certificated 
English teachers, seven of whom are ladies. 

Among the instructors in special branches are Prof. 
L. Farina (Spanish, French, and Italian), Prof. G. Troiani 
(piano), Miss Watson Hutton, Gold Medallist, George 
Watson's College (Girls), Edinburgh, 1906 (piano), Prof. 
E. Galvani (violin), Prof. E. Coppini (drawing, c.), and 
oth'ers. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Quilmes High School for Girls. 

Boarding and Day School for Girls, where a good 
general education is obtainable. School examinations are 
held every term, and pupils are also prepared for the 
Cambridge Local Examinations, and in music for the 
Conservatorio de Gaos. 

Great interest is taken in all kinds of sport and athletics 
suitable for the girls, especially Tennis and Hockey. The 
school buildings and grounds are situated in one of the 
highest parts of the pretty southern suburb of Quilmes, and 
so much progress has been made by this educational 
establishment lately, that only this year it has been found 
necessary to acquire the adjacent building for the accom- 
modation of boarders. 

Principal : Miss Ross, Certif. 2nd, Univ. in Arts, Royal 
Univ. Ireland ; Registered Teacher (Column B.) Board of 
Education, England ; late Assistant Mistress at Highfield, 
Hendon, London, England; High School, Florence; St. 
Katharine's School, Quilmes, &c. 

Fees are moderate and strictly inclusive. 

Prospectuses, references, &c., may be had on applica- 
tion to the Principal, Calle Paz, corner of Rivadavia, 
Quilmes, 'F.C.S. 

St. Andrew's Scotch School. 

CALLE IxuzAiNc6, 530-552. 

The above school is one of the oldest in the country, 
having been established for seventy years. The Head 
Master is Mr. William P. Hardie, Edinburgh University; 
and Head Mistress, Miss Jane Donald, Aberdeen Training 
College. 

Fees: $6 to $20 (paper) per month according to age 
of the pupil, and the course of studies undertaken. Further 
information can be obtained from the Headmaster, or the 
Hon. Treasurer, J. Monteith Drysdale, 77 Calle Florida, 
Buenos Aires. 



GUIDE TO HUENOS AIRES. 

St. Andrew's Academy. 

PATRICIOS 19, CORNER MARTIN GARCIA, BUENOS AIKES. 

Stq/. 

I. The Principal : L. Christie, L.A., F.E.I. S., Prizeman 
in Education, Edinburgh University. 

II. Spanish Master : Sr. Sanchez Moreno, de la Uni- 
versidad de Madrid. 

III. hidy Superintendent : Mrs. Neath. 

IV. T. J. R. Hindmarsh, B.A., Scholar and Prizeman, 
University of Durham. 

V. Miss Laura Ruffle, Edinburgh University. 

All the above are experienced, trained, and Government 
certificated teachers. 

VI. Miss Ada Mathews. 

VII. Miss Blodwen Williams. 

Curriculum. 

I. Distinct courses in English and Spanish, providing 
a thorough grounding in spelling, grammar, and arithmetic. 

II. Commercial subjects: Writing, shorthand, book- 
keeping, typewriting ; French and geography. 

III. Accomplishments : Singing, needlework, music, 
drawing, and painting. 

IV. Athletics : Football, cricket, drill, and gymnastics. 

>~ Fees. 

From $10 to $20 per month. 
Oxford Junior Examination Class, $20 per month. 

St. Katharine's School, Quilmes, F.C.S. 

FOUNDED, 1903, 
FOR THE DAUGHTERS OF ENGLISH - SPEAKING PEOPLE. 

Boarders only are admitted. 
144 




Camp Coach (La Galera), Argentina. 



[P/wfo: A. IV. B.&C* 



Visitor : The Bishop of the Falkland Islands. 

Warden : Canon Stevenson. 

Head Mistress : Miss E. E. Warrell, Cambridge His- 
torical Tripos, ist class; late of the Dulwich High School, 
and Sydenham Secondary School, England, and also of 
Havergal College, Winnipeg, Canada. 

The school-buildings are most advantageously situated 
on the edge of the high land overlooking the River Plate 
in a well-wooded quinta (country house), consisting of about 
three squares of land, producing fruit and vegetables, con- 
taining two gravel tennis-courts, a croquet-lawn, and a large 
playing field for cricket and hockey. 

Queen Victoria College, San Fernando, F.C.C.A. 

Head Master : A. Stuart Pennington, Lond. Univ., to 
whom please apply for terms. 

145 * 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Lomas Academy. 

Lomas Academy was founded in the year 1891 by 
Messrs. R. L. Goodfellow and W. Wyatt Hayward. A 
good commercial education is given, and boys can be 
prepared for English Public Schools if required. The 
present Principal, Mr. R. W. Rudd, has been in charge for 
ten years, and has about 150 boys under his charge. Ex- 
aminations are held at the end of each year under the 
supervision of the College of Preceptors, London. 

All pupils in attendance are members of the Lomas 
Athletic Club. The school is divided into three sections, 
and fees charged are : Preparatory, Sio per month : Lower 
School, $15 ; Upper School, 820. 

Girton House. 

347 GENERAL HORNOS, BUENOS AIRES. 

Principals : Mrs. Edgar Ivens and Mrs. Maberly- 
Hassal, supported by efficient staff. 

English classes, advanced and elementary, for girls only. 

Candidates will be prepared for the Oxford or Cam- 
bridge examinations if desired. 

Extra subjects : Music, French, Painting, Elocution. 

Alexandra College. 

DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. CRAMER 1791 (BRI.ORANO). 

Principal: Mrs. F. C. Lee, Trained and Certified 
Teacher, C. of S. Normal School and C. of S. Training 
College, Aberdeen ; Ex-Head Mistress Foveran School, 
Aberdeen, and St. Andrew's Scotch School, Buenos Aires ; 
certificated in Science, Drawing, Cooking, and Physical 
Training. 

Sta/. 

Madame Perthuy : French Literature and Conversation. 
Mrs. Thekla Baun : Piano and Theory. 
146 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Mrs. J. MacKinnell : Drawing and Painting. 
Half-boarders and a few boarders admitted. Terms on 
application to the Principal, Cramer 1791. 

Kingsbury Academy. 

DAY AND BOARDING SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, BANFIELD 
WEST, F.C.S. 

Principal: M. Junor Kingsbury. 

The above school occupies a spacious, airy house, with 
large garden. Calle Acevedo 1548, one square from 
Banfield station. The Academy offers thorough English 
and Spanish education, and has a complete staff of com- 
petent teachers. 

Pupils are prepared for Oxford Local. 

Outside pupils are admitted to classes in Language, 
Elocution, Music, Drawing, Painting, and Needlework. 

For terms apply to Principal. 

St. Lucy's English School. 

Principal: Lawrence Dillon, 1 138 Av. Monies de Oca, 1150. 

Victoria College, 

CALLE VIDAL 2228, BELGRANO, F.C.C.A. 
Principal : Miss Violet Callis. 

Scotch School, 

SANTO DOMINGO 862, BARRACAS AL NORTE, 
BUENOS AIRES. 

Head Master : John J. Campbell. 

Liceo Rivadavia. 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL OF THE METHODIST 
CHURCH. 

147 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

Twenty -first Year. 

A School for the careful education of girls and young 
women. Tuition in English and Spanish, music and 
languages, at moderate prices. Uniformly successful in 
Government examinations. 

Address Direction, Cochabamba 2012, Buenos Aires. 



The Argentine Evangelical Schools and Institutes. 

(FREE.) 

Superintendent : 

William C. Morris, Calle Uriarte 2572, Buenos Aires. 
SUMMARY. 

This work was commenced in June, 1898, with 18 poor 
boys. During ten years 25,028 boys and girls have passed 
through the Schools and Institutes. Of these 22,300 have 
received school-books, &c., free. 23,600 have received 
boots and clothes twice a year. 8841 have received 
medical assistance and medicine. 5947 have been assisted 
during convalescence. 4638 poor families, related to the 
school children, have been helped in various ways. Em- 
ployment has been obtained for 1089 boys and girls who 
have left the Schools. (This number does not include the 
apprentices from the Trades Institute, nor the graduates 
from the School of Telegraphy, for whom employment has 
been obtained. 94 apprentices from the Trades Institute 
have been employed, after having completed a preparatory 
course of instruction. 147 members of the School of 
Telegraphy have passed satisfactory examinations, and for 
these employment has been obtained, chiefly on the 
railways. 

1 68 policemen have attended the Night Classes specially 
organized for them. Employment has been obtained for 

148 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

776 members of the families of school children (parents, 
or older brothers or sisters). 72 prisoners have been 
helped during their imprisonment, and assisted to employ- 
ment when their term had expired. 

This work comprises 8 Day Schools, 3 Night Schools, 
i Trades Institute, i School of Telegraphy, i School Band, 
4 Sunday Schools, i School Museum, i Teachers' Library. 

5300 children are now connected with these Institutions. 

The character of the work is educational, philan- 
thropical, Christian, Evangelical, and National. 

The origin of the children represents 13 different 
nationalities. 

The work has the warm approval of the National School 
Board, the Municipal authorities, and the National Con- 
gress and Government. 

Much more generous help is needed for this large and 
growing work, which has come to be a social factor of 
real importance in the life and development of this mar- 
vellously growing country. 

All contributions and communications should be ad- 
dressed to the Superintendent, William C. Morris. 



The Children's Home, 

CALLE GUANACACHA, AND ARCOS, BELGRANO. 

Committee. 

Pirsident : Mrs. Boote. 

Vice-President; Mrs. Carnegie Ross. 

Hon. Secretary : Mrs. L'Estrange Wallace. 

Hon. Treasurer: Mrs. Cutts. 

Mrs. Campbell Getty, Mrs. Knight, Mrs. Morrison, 
Mrs. Roberts, Mrs. Rymer Watson, Miss Dawney. 

Suplentes : Mrs. Baines, Mrs. G. Bell, Mrs. Hope 
Gibson. 

149 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

The Home is for the children of British or American 
parentage. It is intended primarily for those whose 
mothers are compelled to work for their maintenance. It 
also receives motherless children and orphans. 

Children are admitted between the ages of three and 
nine years. 

Fees are charged according to the means of the parents. 
A few special cases may be taken free. 

Young Women's Christian Association, 

CALI.E DEFENSA 437, BUENOS AIRES. 

For young women of all nationalities and creeds. Board 
and room, $2.50 per day, or $50 to $80 per month. Lunch 
and tea-room ; register for governesses and nurses ; direc- 
tory of boarding houses ; traveller's aid ; savings bank ; 
circulating library ; educational classes and clubs ; Bible 
classes and Gospel meetings ; social evenings and enter- 
tainments. 

Board of Management: Madame Vovet, Mrs. A. V. 
Boote, Mrs. H. W. Bolting, Mrs. E. E. Cordner, Mrs. Jas. 
Colquhoun, Mrs. C. W. Drees, Miss R. V. Dawney, Mrs. 
C. J. Ewald, Mrs. Robert Fraser, Mrs. Freed Fletcher, 
Mrs. Wm. Field, Mrs. Alex. Grant, Mrs. J. J. Kyle, Miss 
Maude MacLean, Mrs. H. Macluske, Mrs. H. B. Owen, 
Mrs. E. G. Pilgrim, Mrs. E. Rocelci-Lanoir, Mrs. B. A. 
Shuman, Mrs. A. Tuddenham, Mrs. Von Steiger. 

President : Mrs. C. W. Dreea. 

Treasurer: Mrs. H. Macluske. 

General Secretary : Miss E. Jean Batty, Mrs. Runci- 
man. 



GUlt>E TO BUENOS AIRES'. 

VISITORS' DIRECTORY. 

H.B.M. Minister: Mr. Walter Beaupre Townley, Calle 

Santa Fe 1206. Office hours, 10 a.m. to i p.m. 
H.B.M. Consul: Mr. A. Carnegie Ross, C.B., Recon- 

quista 334. 
American Minister: Mr. Charles Hitchcock Sherrill, Calle 

Charcas 634. Office hours, 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 
American Consul-General: Mr. Richard M. Bartleman, 

Suipacha 612. 

German Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary : Julius Waldthausen, Esmeralda 873. 
The League of the Empire : Calle Cangallo 666. 
British Hospital : Perdriel Corner of Caseros. 
Woman' s Exchange : Cangallo 623. 
American Church : Corriente.s 718. 
Scotch Church, St. Andrew's : Calle Bclgrano 575. 
St. John's Anglican Church: Calle 25 de Mayo 280. 
Irish Orphanage : Boulevard Gaona Corner of Bella Vista. 
Salvation Army : Rivadavia 3290. 
Passionist Fathers : Corner of Urquiza and Estados 

Unidos. 

Young Men's Christian Association: Moreno 452. 
Young Women's Christian Association : Defensa 487. 
S/. Andrew's Society of the River Plate : President, Rev. 

J. VV. Fleming, B.D., Scotch Church, Peru 352 ; Hon. 

Sec., J. E. Stewart, M.I.C.E., Avenue de Mayo 651. 
Christ Church (Anglican) : Calle Uspallata 657, Montes 

de Oca. 

Baptist Church: Lima 1552, Plaza Constitucion. 
Christian Science Reading .Rooms : Santa Fe 1680. 
English Literary Society : Calle Cangallo 536. 
For Post Cards of the City, late English Papers, Circulating 

Library : Mitchell's, Cangallo, i door from Calle Florida. 



CUID TO BUENOS AtRES. 

ARGENTINE WORDS AND PHRASES 
With Phonetic Pronunciation. 



In the few words and phrases given in the following 
pages to assist the new arrival in a Spanish-speaking country 
to make himself understood, the pronunciation is given, as 
nearly as is possible, in English spelling. At the same 
time, it is as well to bear in mind a few general rules for 
further guidance. 

The consonant ' j,' the pronunciation of which is given 
as ' h ' in the English spelling, is pronounced somewhat 
gutturally, although not so hard as the German ' ch'. 
Thus, 'joven' (young) should be pronounced something 
between the German spelling ' choven ' and the English 
spelling ' hoven '. 

The double ' 1 ' (11) is given its proper Spanish pro- 
nunciation ' 1'ye ' in the guide, but, as a matter of fact, here 
in Argentina it is pronounced as a soft ' j ' as in the French 
word ' je '. Thus, ' lleve ' (carry) is given as ' I'yay'-veh,' 
which is its authentic pronunciation, but in Argentina it is 
pronounced as ' jay'-veh,' the ' j ' being extremely soft. 

Except when otherwise indicated by an accent, stress 
should always be laid on the penultimate syllable. This 
rule, however, does not apply to verbs in the infinitive 
mood, ending in ' ar,' ' er ' or ' ir'. Thus, ' camino ' (subs.) 
(a road) is pronounced ' Kah-mee-no,' the accent being on 
the last syllable "but one, whereas ' caminar ' (verb) (to 
walk) is pronounced ' Kah-mee-nar,' the accent in this case 
being on the last syllable. 

In Argentina ' y ' is very often pronounced as a soft ' j. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

' S ' and ' z ' are invariably pronounced hard, like the 
English double ' s ' (ss). 

When writing in the interrogative mood in Spanish, the 
note of interrogation proceeds and follows the query, the 
preceding note being inverted. 

In conversation, the pronouns of the first person singular 
and plural and second person singular and plural are seldom 
called into use, being understood by the termination of the 
verb. Thus, ' I know ' is ' Yo se ' but, in conversation, if 
wishing to say ' I do not know,' ' No se ' will suffice, the 
pronoun ' yo ' being understood. Equally, ' Do you not 
know ? ' would be '<; No sabe ? ' the pronoun ' listed ' being 
likewise understood. 

The consonant ' g ' before ' e ' or ' i ' is pronounced as 
an aspirate and slightly guttural. 

Cardinal Numbers. 

English. Argentine. Pronunciation. 

One, Uno, 06- no. 

Two, Dos, dos. 

Three, Tres, trehss. 

Four, Quatro, kwah'-troh. 

Five, Cinco, sing'-ko. 

Six, Seis, seh'-iss. 

Seven, Siete, se-eh'-the. 

Eight, Of/io, oh'-cho. 

Nine, Ntteve, noo-eh'-veh. 

Ten, Diez, dee-es'. 

Eleven, Once, ohn'-se. 

Twelve, Doce, doh'-seh. 

Thirteen, Trece, treh'-seh. 

Fourteen Catorce, kah-tohr'-seh. 

Fifteen, Quince, keen'-seh. 

Sixteen, Diez y sets, de-ess e seh-iss. 
153 



^Buenos Jlires $ Pacific Railway. 



ACROSS 
THE CONTINENT 

Through the 
Province of BUENOS AIRES. 

SANTA FE SAN JUAN 

CORDOBA MENDOZA 

PAMPA CENTRAL SAN LUIS 

To VALPARAISO in 38 Hours. 



DISTRICTS to see and Invest Money in : 

ALFALFA lands in South of San Luis, Cordoba, and 

down to the Pampa Central. 
WHEAT lands near Bahia Blanca, and in South of 

Sante Fe and Cordoba. 
MAIZE lands from Buenos Aires out to Isabel and 

Germania. 

CATTLE Camps in the far West. 
VINEYARD and FRUIT lands in the Cuvo Provinces. 



City Office ; Calle 25 de Mayo, 281, Buenos Aires. 

'54 




Alto Parana, Argentine Republic. 

Showing part of Falls of Iguazii. 



{.Photo: A, //'. B. &> C. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Seventeen, 


Diez y siete, 


de-ess e se-eh'-teh. 


Eighteen, 


Diez y echo, 


de-ess e oh-cho. 


Nineteen, 


Diez y nneve, 


de-ess oe no-eh'-veh. 


Twenty, 


Veinte, 


veh-in'-teh. 


Twenty-one, 


Veinte y uno, 


veh-in'-teh e oo-no. 


Twenty-five, 


Veinte y cinco, 


veh-in'-teh e sing-ko. 


Thirty, 


Treinta, 


treh-in'-tah. 


Thirty-one, 


Treintay uno, 


treh-in'-tah e oo'-no. 


Forty, 


Cuarenta, 


kwahr-en'-tah. 


Fifty, 


Cincuenta, 


sing-kwen'-tah, 


Sixty, 


Sestnta, 


seh-sent'-ah. 


Seventy, 


Setenta, 


seh-ten'-tah. 




155 





GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Eighty, 


Ochenta, 


Ninety, 


Noventa, 


Hundred, 


Cien, 


Two hundred, 


Dosdentos, 


Three hundred, 


Tresdentos, 


Four hundred, 


Cuatrodentos, 


Five hundred, 


Quinientos, 


Six hundred, 


Seisdentos, 


Seven hundred, 


Setedentos, 


Eight hundred, 


OchodcntoS) 


Nine hundred, 


Novedentos, 


Thousand, 


Mil, 


Million, 


Millon, 




Ordinal Numbers, 


The first, 


El primero, 


The second, 


El segundo, 


The third, 


El tercero, 


The fourth, 


El cuarto, 


The fifth, 


El quinto. 


The sixth, 


El sexto, 


The seventh, 


El septimo. 


The eighth, 


El octavo. 


The ninth, 


El noveno, 


The tenth, 


El dedmo, 


The eleventh, 


El undedmo, 


The twelfth, 


El duodedmo. 


The thirteenth, 


El dedmoterdo, 


The fourteenth, 


El dedmocuartO) 


The fifteenth, 


El dedmoquintO) 


The sixteenth, 


El decimosexto^ 


The seventeenth, 


El dednwscptinw, 



156 



Pronunciation. 

oh-chen'-tah. 

no-ven'-tah. 

see-en. 

dos-see-en'-tos. 

tres-see-en'-tos. 

kvvah'-tro-see-en'-tos. 

kee-ne-en'-tos. 

seh'-is-se-en'-tos. 

seh'-teh-see -en'-tos. 

o'-cho-see-en'- tos. 

no-'veh-see-en'-tos. 

mill. 

Mill-yohn'. 

> 

el pree-mair'-o. 

el seh-goon'-do. 

el tair-sair'-o. 

el koo-ar'-to. 

el kin'-to. 

el sex'-to. 

el sep'-tee-mo. 

el ok-tah'-vo. 

el no-vch'-no. 

el dai'-see-mo. 

el oon-dai'-see-mo. 

el doo-o-dai'-see-mo. 

el dai'-see-mo-tair'- 

see-o. 

dai'-see-mo-koo-ar'-to. 
dai'-see-mo-kin'-to. 
dai'-see-mo- sex'-to. 
dai' - see -mo - se"p - tee- 

mo). 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 

The eighteenth, 

The nineteenth, 
The twentieth, 
The twenty-first, 

The thirtieth, 
The fortieth, 

The fiftieth, 

The sixtieth, 
The seventieth, 

The eightieth, 
The ninetieth, 
The hundredth, 
The thousandth, 
The last, 



Argentine. 

El decimooctavo, 

El derimonono, 

El vigesimo, 

El vigesimoprimero, 

El trig'esimo 
El cuadragesimO) 

El quincuagesimo, 

El sexagesimo, 
El septuagesimo, 

El octogesimo, 
El nonagesimo, 
El centesimo, 
El milesimo, 
El ultimo, 



Pronunciation . 

dai' - see -mo-ok-tah'- 
vo. 

dai'-see-mo-no-no. 

vee-jay '-see-mo. 

vee- jay'- see-mo -pree- 
mair'-o. 

tree-jay'-see-mo. 

koo-ah-drah-hay'-see- 
mo. 

kin-koo-ah - hay'- see- 
mo. 

sex-ah-hay'-see-mo. 

sep - too - ah - hay' - see- 
mo). 

ok-to-hay'-see-mo. 

no-nah-hay'-see-mo. 

sen-tay'-see-mo. 

meel-ai'-see-mo. 

ool'-te-mo. 



The Custom House (La Aditana) La ah-doo-ah-na. 
Here is my luggage, Aqui esta mi equi- Ah-kee' ess-tah'mee 



I have nothing to 

declare, 
How much is the 

duty ? 



paje, 



eh-kee-pah-heh. 



No tengo nada qm No tengo nah-dahkeh 



declarar, 

Cuanto es el dere- 

cho? 



deh-clah-rar. 
Kwahn-to ess el deh- 
reh-cho. 



A cab ( Un cache) Oon koh-cheh. 
Call a cab for me, Llamame un coche, L'yah-mah-me oon 

koh-cheh). 

Drive me to the Llevamed la Aveni- L'yeh-vah-me ah lah 
Avenida, da, Ah-veh-nee-dah. 



C.UIDK TO BUENOS AIRES. 



I 



How much have I to 

pay? 
How long will it 

take to get there ? 

Show us the sights 
of the town, 



Argentine. 

/ Cuanto tengo qu( 
Pagar ? 

I Cuanto tiempo em- 
pleamos para 
llegar ? 

Ensenenos lo princi- 
pal de la ciudad, 



Where are you go- / Dond< va ? 

ing? 

Stop here, 
Straight on, 
How far is it ? 
What time shall we 

arrive ? 
I want to go to 

the 



Pare aqu'i, 
Sigue derecho, 
I Que distanria es 1 
I A que hora l/ega- 

mos ? 
Quiero if al 



Pronunciation. 
Kwhan-toh ten-goh 

keh pah-gahr. 
Kwhan-toh tee-em-po 

em-play-ah-moss pah- 

rah 1'yeh-gar. 
En-sain-yeh-nos lo 

prin-ci-pahl deh lah 

see-oo-dahd. 
Don-deh vah. 

Pah-reh ah-kee. 
See-geh deh-reh-cho. 
Keh dis-tahn-see-a ess. 
Ah-keh oh-rah 1'yeh- 

gah-moss. 
Kee-air-oh eer al. 



The 

Could you let me 

have a bed for the 

night ? 
Let me see the 

room, 
Take our luggage 

upstairs, 

Where is the lift ? 

Put these in my 

room. 
I want, 
It does not matter, 



Hotel, El Hotel (El oh-tehl ). 

/ Podria Vd, alo- 

jarme por esta 

noche 1 
Dejeme vtr el cuarto. 



Lleve nuestro equi- 
paje, arriba, 

I Donde esta el as- 

censor f 
Ponga estos en mi 

pieza, 
Quiero, 
No importa t 
158 



Po-dree-ah oos-ted ah- 

lo-har-meh pores-tah 

no-che. 
Dai-heh-meh vair el 

koo-ar-toh. 
L'yeh-veh noo-es'-troh 

eh-kee-pa-heh ah- 

ree-bah. 
Don-deh es-tah el ahs- 

cen-sor. 
Pon-gah ess-tohs en 

mee pee-ess-ah. 
Kee-air-oh. 
No im-port-a 








Sunday Outing, Argentine Camp. 



{Photo: A. V. B. & C. 



English. Argentine. 

What is the name I Como sc llama ? 

of? 
Why not ? 



Where can I ? 



/ Porque no ? 
I Donde puedo ? 



Pronunciation . 

Koh-mo seh 1'yah- 

mah. 

Por-keh no. 
Don-deh poo-eh-doh. 



Can you tell me ? iPiiede Vd, decirme? Poo-ai-deh oos-teh 

deh-seer-me). 

Where is the Restaurant ? / Donde esld el restaurant? 
(Don-deh ess-tah' el rehs-ta-oo-rahn\ 

Waiter, Mozo, Moh-so. 

Waiter ! give me the Mozo ! deme la lista Moh-soh deh-meh lah 
bill of fare, de los platos^ lees-tah deh los plah- 

tohs, 
159 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



Eiig-lish. Argentine. Pronunciation. 

What have you / Que tiene Vd. listo ? Keh tee-ain-eh oos-tay 

ready ? 
How long will it 

take? 
Give me something 

else, 
I want a cup of 

coffee with milk, 



lees-toh. 
I Cuanto tiempo torn- Coo-an-to tee-em-poh 

ard esol toh-mah ra' eh-soh. 

Deme otra cosa, Deh-meh o-trah co-sah. 



Qitiero una tasa de 
cafe con leche, 



How much is it ? 
Keep the change, 



/ Cuanto es '( 
Gu&rdese el cambio, 



Bring me, 


Traigame, 


A plate, 


Un plato, 


The wine list, 


La lista de vinos, 


A table, 


Una mesa, 


Ice, 


Hielo, 


Ice-cream, 


Hclado, 


A bottle, 


Una botella, 


A glass, 


Un -vaso, 


A knife, 


Un cuchillo, 


A fork, 


Un tenedor, 


A spoon, 


Una cuchara, 


Bread, 


Pan, 


Butter, 


Manteca, 


Beer, 


Cetveza, 


Water, 


Agua, 


Soup, 


SoJ>a, 


Fish, 


Pescado, 


Beefsteak, 


Bife, 


Mutton, 


Carnero, 



Kee - eh - roh oo - nah 

tass-ah deh kah-feh' 

con leh-tcheh. 
Coo-an-to ess. 
Goo - ar' - deh - seh el 

cahm-bee-oh. 
Tra-ee-gah-meh'. 
Oon plah-to. 
Lah lees-tah de veen- 

nohs. 

Oon-ah meh-sah. 
Ee-ai-loh. 
Eh-lah-do. 
Oon-ah bo-tel-yah. 
Oon vah-so. 
Oon koo-chee-yoh. 
Oon teh-neh-dohr. 
Oon - ah koo - tcha - 

rah. 
Pahn. 

Man-teh-kah. 
Sehr-veh sah. 
Ah-gwah. 
Soh-pah. 
Pehs-kah-doh. 
Bee-feh. 
Kahr-neh-roh. 



160 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Veal, 


Ternera, 


Tehr-neh-rah. 


Lamb, 


Cordero, 


Kor-deh-roh. 


Pork, 


Cerdo, 


Sair-doh. 


Ham, 


Jam on, 


Hah-mohn'. 


Chicken, 


Polio, 


Poh-lyoh. 


Turkey, 


Pavo, 


Pah-voh. , 


Duck, 


Pato, 


Pah-toh. 


Eggs, 


Huevos, 


Weh-vohs. 


Cheese, 


Queso, 


Keh-soh. 


Pastry, 


Pasteles, 


Pah-steh-lehs. 


Dessert, 


Postre, 


Pohs-treh. 


Pepper, 


Pimiento) 


Pim-e-en-toh. 


Salt, 


Sal, 


Sahl. 


Oil, 


Aceite, 


Ah-seh-ee-teh. 


Vinegar, 


Vinagre, 


Vee-nah-greh. 


Mustard, 


Mostaza, 


Moss-tah-sah. 


Sauce, 


Salsa, 


Sahl-sah. 


Fruit, 


Fruta, 


Froo-tah. 


Chop, 


Costilla, 


Kohs-tee-lyah. 


Potatoes, 


Papas, 


Pah-pahs. 


Cabbage, 


Repollo, 


Reh-poh-lyo. 


Cauliflower, 


Coliflor, 


Kohl-eh-flohr. 


Salad, 


Ensalada, 


En-sah-lah-da. 


Omelette, 


Tortilla, 


Tor-tee-lyah 


Apple, 


Manzana, 


Mahn-sah-nah. 


Pears, 


Peras, 


Peh-rahs. 


Grapes, 


Uvas, 


Oo-vahs. 


Pine-apple, 


Anana, 


Ah-nah-nah. 


Oranges, 


Naranjas, 


Nah-rahn-khas. 


Cigar, 


Cigarro, 


See-gah-roh. 


Cigarette, 


Cigarillo, 


See-gah-ree-lyoh. 


Nothing more, 


Nada mas, 


Nah-dah mass. 


The bill, 


La cuenta, 


La koo-en-tah. 




161 


L 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. Argentine. Pronunciation. 

This is not correct, Esto no esta Men, Ess-toh no ess-tah' 

bee-en. 

There is a mistake, Hay una equivocation Eye oon-ah eh-kee- 

voh-kah-see-ohn. 

Times and Seasons, El tiempoy las estaciones 
tee-em-poh ee las ehss-tah-see-oh-ness). 



(El 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

The year, 

The month, 

The day, 

The night, 

The hour, 

The minute, 

The second, 

A moment, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

l-'riday, 



Enero, 
Febrero, 
Marzo, 
Abril, 
Mayo, 
Junto, 
Julio, 
Agosto, 
Setiembre, 
Octubre, 
Noriembre, 
Ditiembrc, 
El afio, 
El tries, 
El dia, 
La noche, 
La hora, 
El minnf<>. 
El segundo, 
Un momentfl, 
Domingo, 
Lunes, 
Martes, 
Miercoles, 
Jnei'es, 
I'icr/tes, 

162 



Eh-neh-roh. 

Feb-reh-roh. 

Mahr-soh. 

Ah-breel. 

Mah-yoh. 

Hoon-yoh. 

Hool-yoh. 

Ah-gohs-toh. 

Seh-tee-em-breh. 

Ok-too-breh. 

No-vee-em-breh. 

Dee-see-em-breh. 

El ahn-yo. 

El mess. 

El dee-ah. 

La no-chay. 

Lah oh-rah. 

El mee-noo-toh. 

El seh-goon-doh. 

Oon moh-men-toh. 

Doh-meen-goh. 

Loo-nehss. 

Mahr-tehss. 

Mee-er'-koh-less. 

Whey-vess. 

Vce-er-ness. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Spring, 


Primavera^ 


Summer, 


Verano, 


Autumn, 


Otono, 


Winter, 


Invierno, 


Saturday, 


Sdbado, 


The week, 


La semana, 


Half an hour, 


Media bora, 


Three hours and a 


Tres horas y media 


half, 




One hour ago, 


Hace una hora, 


A century, 


Un siglo, 


To-morrow, 


Manana, 


This morning, 


Esta manana, 


This afternoon, 


Esta tarde, 


The day before 


Antes de aver, 


yesterday, 




At midnight, 


A media noche, 


Rain, 


Lhn'ia, 


The sun, 


El sol, 


The moon, 


La luna, 


The stars, 


Las estrellas, 


The sky, 


El cielo, 


Sunrise, 


El amanecer, 


Last week, 


La semana pasada, 



Yesterday morning, Aver por la manana, 

Yesterday afternoon, Aver por la tarde 

Yesterday evening, Anoche, 

Last night, Attache, 

Sunset, Anochecer, 

To-morrow morning, Manana por la ma- 
iia/ia, 



Pronunciation. 
Pree-mah-veh-rah. 
Veh-rah-noh. 
Oh-tohn-yoh. 
In-vee-er-noh. 
Sah'-bah-doh. 
La seh-mah-nah. 
Meh-de-ah oh-rah. 
Tress oh-rahs ee meh- 

dee-ah. 

Ah-seh oo-nah oh-rah. 
Oon see-gloh. 
Mahn-yah nah. 
Ess-tah mahn-yah-nah. 
Ess-tah tahr-deh. 
Ahn-tess deh ah-yare. 

Ah meh-de-ah no- 

cheh. 

Lyoo-vee-ah. 

El sohl. 

La loon-ah. 

Lahs ess-treh-lyas. 

El see-eh-loh. 

El ah-mah-neh-sair. 

Lah sem-mahn-na pah- 

sah-da. 

Ah-yair por lah mahn- 
yah-nah. 

Ah-yairpor lah tar-deh. 
Ah-no-cheh. 
Ah-no-cheh. 
Ah-no cheh-sehr. 
Mahn-yah-nah por la 

mahn-yah nah. 



Cordoba Central and 
Cordoba and Rosario Railways 



Direct Route between Buenos Aires 
and the Northern Provinces. 



CORDOBA MOUNTAINS, SUMMER RESORTS. 

Special return tickets at reduced rates are issued from Rosario, 
F.C.C. y R., during the season, commencing on the ist of November 
until 3 ist of March, available to return until the 3Oth of April, to 

Jesus Maria, Sarmiento, La Calera, Santa Maria, 

Cosquin, La Falda, Huerta Grande, La Cumbre. 

San Esteban, and Capilla del Monte. 



ROSARIO DE LA FRONTERA WINTER RESORT. 

Trains for Rosario de la Frontera Thermal Baths are equipped 
with splendid saloon, sleeping, restaurant, and buffet cars. 

The catering for the latter being done direct by the Railway 
Company, only articles of food and refreshments of the very best 
quality are supplied to passengers. Special return tickets at reduced 
fares are issued from Cordoba and Rosario (F. C. C. & R.) during 
the season. 

BOOKING OF MERCHANDISE AND GENERAL 
CARGO TO AND FROM BUENOS AIRES. 

In order to secure quick transport for goods destined to San 
Francisco, Rafaela, Cordoba, Rioja, Catamarca, Santiago, Tucuman, 
Salta, and Jujuy, merchants are requested to book all consignments 
from ' Digue 4 ' Station ( Buenos Aires). 

For further particulars apply to the Administration in Cordoba 

I B. Mitre, 519, Buenos Aires. 
Or ' Las Heras, 622, Tucuman. 
| San Martin, 695, Rosario. 

DUNCAN M. MUNRO, General Manager. 
164 




Sierras de Cordoba (Cordoba Hills), "Argentine Republic. 

{Photo : II. G. 



English. Argentine. 

To-morro\vafternoon, Mauana por la tarde, 

To-morrow evening, Mananapor/a noche, 

Last month, El mes pasado, 

Next month, El mes proximo, 

The day after to- Pasada j/iaiiana, 

morrow 

What o'clock is it ? j Qite hora es ? 

Five minutes past Las ocho y cinco, 

eight, 

Seven o'clock, Las siete, 

165 



Pronunciation. 

Mahn-yah-nah por lah 

tar-deh. 
Mahn-yah-nah por la 

no-cheh. 

El mehsspah-sah-doh. 
El mehss prox-e-moh. 
Pass-ah-doh mahn-yah- 

nah. 

Kay oh-rah ess. 
Las o-cho ee sing-ko. 

Las see-eh-teh. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 
Half past three, 

At what time ? 



Argentine. 

Las ires y media, 

I A que hora ? 



Pronunciation. 
Las trehs ee meh-dee- 

ah. 
Ah keh oh -rah. 



Ten minutes to four, Las cuatro menos diez, Las kwah-troh meh- 

nos dee-ez. 



City Buildings, Streets, etc., Edificios, calles, etc. 
(Eh-dee-fee-see-ohs, cah-lyehs, etc). 

El ban'-koh. 

Lah kah-lyeh. 

Lah kah-sah. 

El poo-en-teh. 

Lah kah-teh-drahl. 

Lah ee-glay-see-eh. 

Lah ess-kee-nah. 

La em-bah-hahda. 

La bohl-sah. 

Lah fah-bree-kah. 

El hard-een. 

La poo-er-tah. 

La ven tah-nah. 

El pee-soh. 

El teh-choh. 

El kwah-droh. 

El oss-pee-tahl. 

El boo-sdhn. 

El mehr-kah-doh. 

El moo-seh-oh. 

Los ahl-reh-deh-doh- 

rehs. 

El e-po-dro-moh. 
El ree-o. 



The bank, 


El banco. 


The street, 


La calk, 


The house, 


La casa, 


The bridge, 


El Puente, 


The cathedral, 


La catidral, 


The church, 


La iglesia, 


The corner, 


La esquina. 


The embassy, 


La embajada, 


The Stock Exchange, 


La Boha, 


The factory, 


La fabrica, 


The garden, 


El jarditi, 


The door, 


La puerta, 


The window, 


La ventana, 


The floor, 


El piso, 


The roof, 


El techo, 


The picture, 


El cnadro, 


The hospital, 


El hospilal, 


The letter-box, 


El buzon, 


The market, 


El metcado, 


The museum, 


El museo, 


The outskirts, 


Los alrededores, 


The racecourse, 


El hipbdromo^ 


The river. 


El rio, 




166 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 

-The road, 
The school, 
The store, 
The theatre, 
The quay, 



Argentine. 

El camino, 
La escuela, 
El almacen, 
El teafro, 
El muelle, 



Pronunciation. 

El kah-mee-no. 
Lah ess-koo-eh-la. 
El ahl-mah-sehn. 
El teh-ah-troh k 
El moo-el-lyeh. 



Correspondence, Correspondenda (Cor-res-pohn-den-cee-a). 
Where is the post ? Donde estd el cor- Don-deh es-tah' el cor- 



office? 
I want to post a 

letter, 
When does the post 

leave for England? 

Where is the nearest 
pillar-box ? 

I want to get this 
letter registered, 

Please weigh this 
letter for me, 



reo? 
Quiero poner una 

carta en el correo, 
I Cuando sale el cor- 

reopara Inglaterra ? 

I Donde estd el buzon 
mds cerca 1 

Quterocertifiair esta 

car fa, 
Sirvase pcsar esta 

carta para mi, 



reh-o. 
Key-er-o poh-nair una 

car-ta en el cor-reh-o. 
Coo-ahn-do sah-leh el 

cor - reh - o pah - rah 

Ing-glat-air-rah. 
Don-deh es-tah' el 

boo-sohn' mass sair- 

kah. 
Key-er-o cer-tee-fee- 

cahr es-tah cahr-tah. 
Seer-vah-seh peh-sahr 

es-tah cahr-tah pah- 

rah mee. 



The 



The arm, 
The back, 
The bones, 
The beard, 
The blood, 
The brain, 
The breast, 



Human Body, El cuerpo humano 
(El coo-er-poh u-mahn'-noh). 



El brazo, 
La espalda, 
Los hue sos, 
La barba, 
La sangre. 
El cerebrO) 
El pecho, 

167 



El brah-soh. 
La ess-pahl-dah. 
Lohs wheh-sohs. 
L.ih bahr-ba. 
Lah san-greh. 
El seh-reh-broh, 
El peh-choh. 



THE BUENOS AIRES 
WESTERN RAILWAY, LTD. 



WORKING 1305 MILES OF LINE. 



A. F. LERTORA, General Manager. 



THIS Railway runs through the most fertile 'camps' in the Province of Buenos 
Aires, and is an essentially business line, therefore does not attract the eye 
of the tourist, as there is practically nothing to see beyond the large tracts 
of land under cultivation and the pasturage for stock breeding. 

The only place of .interest appealing to every Catholic is the Shrine of Lujan, 
situated in one of the suburbs of Buenos Aires, which is regarded as the finest pieces 




Shrine of Lujan. 

of architectural work in South America, and, as a matter of fact, compares favour- 
ably with any other building of its kind in the world, as the above picture will 
show. Pilgrims continually flock in thousands to this place of Worship. 

As already stated, this Railway runs through the ' camps ' in the Province of 
Buenos Aires, which are considered the best in South America ; the climate is ex- 
ceptionally favourable to agriculture, as neither very hot weather prevails as in the 
North, and not too-frequent rains as are experienced in the South of the Republic. 
We can safely say that there is no better investment for the British capitalist than 
in ' camps ' in the neighbourhood of the Western Railway, as notwithstanding that 
the value of land is considered high to-day, there is no doubt that the ' camps ' will 
double their value in the course of the next few years. 

Further extensions of the Company's lines through the Province of San Luis and 
into the Province of Mendoza have been authorised by the National Government. 

City Office: 552 Calle Cangallo 

Bui.NOS AIKF.S, May 1909. (where further information IO.H tt obtained). 

168 




Argentine Gaucho with Guitar. 



{Photo : A. W. B. 



English.. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


The cheek, 


La mejilla, 


La meh-heel-ya. 


The chin, 


La barba, 


Lah bahr-bah. 


The complexion, 


La fez, 


Lah tehs. 


The ears, 


Las ore/as, 


Las oh-reh-has 


The elbow, 


El code, 


El koh-doh. 


The eye, 


El ojo, 


El oh-hoh. 


The face, 


La cara, 


Lah kah-rah. 


The fingers, 


Los dedos, 


Los deh-dos. 


The foot, 


El pie, 


El pee-ay. 


The forehead, 


La /rente, 


La fren-teh. 


The hair, 


El pelo, 


El peh-loh. 


The hand, 


La mano, 


Lah mah-noh. 


The head, 


La cabeza, 


La kah-beh-sah. 




169 





GUIDE TO BUENOS AIKK.S. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


The heart, 


El corazon, 


El koh-rah-sohn'. 


The heel, 


El talon, 


El tahl-ohn'. 


The leg, 


La piema, 


Lah pee-ehr-nah. 


The lips, 


Los labios, 


Lohs lah-bee-ohs. 


The liver, 


El higado, 


El ee'-gah-doh. 


The lung, 


El pulmon, 


El pool-mohn'. 


The moustache, 


El bigote, 


El bee-goh-teh. 


The mouth, 


La boca, 


La boh-kah. 


The nails, 


Las unas, 


Lahs oon-yas. 


The neck. 


El cuello, 


El koo-ehl-yoh. 


The nose, 


La nariz, 


La nah-reez. 


The ribs, 


Las costillas, 


Lahs kohs-teel-yas. 


The shoulders, 


Los hombros, 


Lohs ohm-brohs. 


The side, 


El costado, 


El kohs-tah-doh. 


The skin, 


El cutis, 


El coo-tis. 


The stomach, 


El estomago, 


El es-tohm'-ah-goh. 


The throat, 


La garganta, 


La gahr-gahn-tah. 


The tongue, 


La lengua, 


La lehn-gwah. 


The tooth, 


El diettte, 


El dee-en-teh. 


The wrist, 


La mufieca, 


Lah moon-yeh-kah. 


Adjectives, Adjetivos 


(Ahd-heh-tee-vohs). 


Bad, 


Malo, 


Mah-loh. 


Broad, 


Ancho, 


An-choh. 


Cheap, 


Barato, 


Bah-rah-toh. 


Clean, 


Limpio, 


Limp-ee-oh. 


Cold, 


Frio, 


Free-oh. 


Dark, 


Obscuro, 


Ob-skoo'-roh. 


Dear (of cost), 


Caro, 


Kah-roh. 


Dirty, 


Sucio, 


Soo-see-oh. 


Dry, 


Sea, 


Seh-koh. 


Early, 


Tetnprano, 


Tem-prah'-noh. 


Easy, 


Facil, 


Fah-seel. 




170 






Gaucho, Argentine Republic. 



U'/w/o: .-1. W. /'. &C 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Equal, 


Igual, 


Ee-gwahl. 


False, 


Falsa, 


Fahl-sah. 


Fat, 


Gordo, 


Gohr-doh. 


Flat, 


Piano, 


Plah-noh. 


Free, 


Libre, 


Lee-breh. 


Fresh, 


Fresco, 


Fress'-koh. 


Full, 


Lleno, 


L'yeh-noh. 


Gay, 


Alegre, 


Ah-leh-greh. 


Good, 


Bueno, 


Boo-eh-noh. 


Great, 


Gran, 


Grahn. 


Handsome, 


Hermoso, 


Ehr-moh-soh. 


Happy, 


Feliz, 


Feh-lees'. 




171 


i ; 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRKS. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Hard, 


Ditro, 


Doo-roh. 


Heavy, 


Pesado, 


Peh-sah-dch. 


Height, 


Altura, 


Ahl-too-rah. 


High, 


Alto, 


Ahl-toh. 


Hollow, 


Hueco, 


Weh-koh. 


Honest, 


Honrado, 


On-rah-doh. 


Hungry, 


AmbrientO) 


Am-bree en-toh. 


III, 


Enfermo, 


En fehr moh. 


Just, 


Justo, 


Hoos-toh. 


Large, 


Grande, 


Grahn-deh. 


Late, 


Tarde, 


Tar-deh. 


Narrow, 


Angosto, 


Ahn gohs-toh. 


N T ew, 


Nuevo, 


Noo eh-voh. 


Old, 


Viejo, 


Vee-eh-hoh. 


Open, 


Abierto, 


Ah-bee-ehr-toh. 


Poor, 


Pobre, 


Poh-breh. 


Pretty, 


Lindo, 


Leen-doh. 


Public, 


Piiblico, 


Poo'-ble-koh. 


Pure, 


Puro, 


Poo-roh. 


Quiet, 


TranqidlO) 


Tran-keel-oh. 


Rich, 


Rico, 


Ree-koh. 


Ripe, 


Maduro, 


Mah-doo-roh. 


Round, 


Redondo, 


Reh-don-doh. 


Sharp, 


Agitdo, 


Ah-goo-doh. 


Short, 


Corto, 


Kohr-toh. 


Small, 


PequenO) 


Peh-kehn-yoh. 


Smooth, 


Liso, 


Lee-soh. 


Soft, 


Blando, 


Blan-doh. 


Sour, 


Agrio, 


Ah'-gree-oh. 


Square, 


Cuadrado, 


Kwah-drah-doh. 


Strange, 


Estrano, 


Ess-tran-yoh. 


Strong, 


Fuerte, 


Foo-ehr-teh. 


Sweet, 


Dulce, 


Dool-seh. 




172 





GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 

English. Argentine. Pronunciation. 

Thick, Espeso, Ess-peh-soh. 

Thin, Delgado, Dehl-gah-doh. 

True, Verdadero, Vehr-dah-deh-roh. 

Ugly, Feo, Feh-oh. 

Useful, Util Oo-teel. 

Warm, Caliente, Kah-lee-en-teh. 

Weak, Debit, Deh-beel. 

Well, Bueno, Boo-eh-noh. 

Whole, Todo, Toh-doh. 

Wide, Ancho, An-choh. 

Young, Joven, Hoh-ven. 

Haircutter, Peluquero (Peh-loo-kair-oh). 

The barber, El barbero, El bahr-beh-roh. 

Cut my hair, Corteme el cabello, Cohr-teh-meh el kah- 

beh-1'yoh. 

Short, Corto, Kohr-toh. 

Not too short, No demasiado corto, Noh de-mah-see-ah- 

doh kohr-toh. 
I wish to be shaved, Quicro afeitarme, Kee-eh-roh ah-feh-e- 

tahr-meh. 

Be careful, Tenga cuidado, Ten-gahquee-dah-doh 

How much is it ? / Cuanto es ? Koo-ahn-toh ess. 

The weather, El tiempo (El tee-em-poh). 
It is cold, Hace frin, Ah-seh free-oh. 

It is warm, Hace color, Ah-seh kah-lohr. 

It is fine, Hace buen tiempo, Ah-seh boo-en tee- 

emp-oh. 

Useful phrases, Prases utiles (Frah-zes oot'-eel-ess). 
So long, Hasta Inego, As-tah loo-ai-go. 

Until to-morrow, Hasta maiiana, As-tah mahn-yah-nah. 



GUIDE TO F.UENOS AIRES. 



English. Argentine. 

Good morning, Buenos d'tas, 

Good afternoon, ) 

Good evening, / 

Good-night, Buenas noches, 

Good-bye, 

How do you do ? 



Buenas tardes, 



Adios, 

j Como esta Vd. ? 



Very well, thank you, 

and yourself? 
Excuse me, 
Have the goodness 

to, 
Speak slower, 

I do not understand, 

Make haste, 

Carry this, 

Where are you going? 

Sometimes, 

Ready, 

Come here, 

It seems to me, 

Many thanks, 



Mm bien, gratias, 

iy Vd.l 
Perdoneme, 
Ha game el favor de, 

Hable mas despacio. 

No comprendo, 
Apuiise, 
LIer>e esto, 
I Donde ra ? 
Algunas veces, 
Listo, 

Venga aqu'i, 
Me parece, 
Miichas gracias, 



I am very sorry. Sic n to mucho, 

I cannot, No puedo, 

Send this linen to Maude esta ropa a 
the laundress, la larandera, 



Where is the bath- 
room ? 



Donde esta el 
cuarto de bafio ? 



I will call again to- Vendre otra rez 
morrow, manafia, 

174 



Pronunciation. 
Boo-eh-nos dee'-as. 

Boo-eh-nas tar-dehs. 

Booh-eh-nas no-chehs. 

A-dee-oss. 

Koh-moh es-tah oos- 

tay. 
Moo-e bee-en grah- 

see-ass ee oo-steh. 
Pair-doh'-neh-meh. 
Ah-gah-meh el fah-vor' 

deh. 
Ah-bleh mass dess- 

pah-see-oh. 
Noh kom-pren-doh. 
Ah-poo-reh-seh. 
L'yeh-veh ess-toh. 
Don-deh vah. 
Ahl-gco-nas vess-es. 
Lees-toh. 
Ven-gah ak-kee'. 
Meh par-re-seh. 
Moo - chas grah - see - 

ahs. 

See-en-to moo-choh. 
Noh poo-eh-doh. 
Mahn-deh ess-tah roh- 

j)ah ah lah lah-vann- 

deh-rah. 
Don-deh ess-tah' el 

koc-ar-toh deh ban- 

yoh. 
Ven-dreh o-trah vess 

man-yan-ah. 




'Going to Market/ Buenos Aires Province. 



\rhoto: A. W. B.&Co. 



English. Argentine. 

I want some matches, Necesito fosforos, 

May one smoke here? } Se puede fumar 

aqui ? 

Es. muy caro, 
ffdgame el favor de 

ensenarme varias 

rinses, 

En seguida, 
Volvere mas tarde, 



It is very dear, 
Please show me 
several kinds, 

At once, 

I will return later, 



I will wait, Yo esferarc, 

Yes, that is all right, Si eso tst<i Ine/ 

175 



Pronunciation. 

Neh-seh-see-toh fohs- 

foh-ros. 
Seh poo-eh-deh foo- 

mahr ah-kee'. 
Ess moo-e kah-roh. 
Ah'-gah-meh el fah-vor 

deh en-sehn-yar-me 

vah-ree-ass clah-cess. 
En seh-guee'-dah. 
Vohl-vair-ay' mass tar- 

deh. 

Yoh es-pair-ah-reh'. 
Cee ess -oh es-tah 

bee-en. 




TUJAKE YOUR VISIT to the Argentine 
Republic a pleasant and permanent 
remembrance by taking with you your 
Portrait by 





THE WORLD-RENOWNED 
CARBON PROCESS 

Has always been a speciality of this house. 



THE MOST ARTISTIC PORTRAIT THAT CAN BE 
MADE, AND ABSOLUTELY PERMANENT. 





176 




GUIDE TO BUEN(5S AIRES. 



English. 
Have you nothing 

cheaper, 
What is the lowest 

price ? 
Wait a moment, 

I beg your pardon, 
Yes, sir, 
No, sir, 
Allow me, 



Argentine. 

No tiene algo mas 

barato, 
I Cual es el ultimo 

precio ? 
Espere un momenta, 

Per done Vd.^ 
Si, sefwr, 
No, senor, 
Permitame Vd., 



Will you tell me ? l Sirvase Vd. dedrme ? 



It does not matter, 

Come in, 

Very well, 

I am in a hurry, 

What is this ? 

Where is? 

Which is the way 

to-? 
Please direct me 

to street, 



The Railway, Eiferracarrii 

The station, La estacidn, 

What is the price i Cuanto cuesta un 

of a ticket to La billete a La Plata ? 

Plata ? 
A single ticket, Un billete de ida, 



No importa, 
Entre Vd., 
Muy bien, 
Estoy de prisa, 
I Que es esto ? 
I Donde estd ? 
I Cual es el camino 

fara ? 
Sirvase indicarme la 

calle 



A return ticket, 



n billete de ida y 
vuelta 

177 



Pronunciation. 
Xoh tee-en-eh al-goh 

mahs bah-rah-toh. 
Kwahl ess el ool'-tee- 

mo preh-se-oh. 
Ess-peh-reh oon moh- 

men-toh. 

Pehr-doh-neh oos-teh. 
See sen-yore. 
Noh sen-yore. 
Pehr - mee - tah - meh 

oos-teh. 
Seer-vah-seh oos-teh 

deh-seer-meh. 
Noh im-pohr-tah, 
En-treh oos-teh. 
Moo-e bee-en. 
Ess-toy de pree-sah. 
Keh ess ess'-toh. 
Don-deh es-tah'. 
Kwahl ess el kah-mee- 

no pah-rah. 
Seer-vah-seh' in-deeh- 

kar' - meh lah cal - 

yeh - . 

feh-roh-kahr-ril). 
Lah es-tah-s'yohri'. 
Coo-an-to coo-es-tah 

oon bil-yeh-teh ah 

Lah Plah-tah). 
Oon bil-yeh-teh deh 

ee-dah. 
Oon bil-yeh-teh deh 

ee-dah ee voo-el-tah. 
M 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 
When does the next 

train leave for Bel- 

grano ? 
Where is the luggage 

office ? 

Do we change car- 

riages here ? 
What station is this ? 



Argentine. 

Cuando sale el prbx- 
imo tren para Bel- 
grano ? 

Donde estd la oficina 
de equipajes ? 

Hay cambio de cache 
aqwft 

Qtte estacibn es esta ? 



Pronunciation. 

Coo-an-doh sah-lai el 
prok'-see-moh trehn 
pah- rah Bell-grah-no. 

Don-deh es-tah' lah 
of-fee-cee-nah deh 
eh-key-pah-hehs. 

I-ee cahm-bee-oh deh 
coh-cheh ah-key'. 

Kai es-tah-s'yohn' ess 
es-tah). 



Adverbs, Conjunctions and Prepositions, Adverbios, 
Conjunciones y Preposiciones (Ahd-vehr-bee ohs, Con-hoon-see- 
oh-nes ee Preh-poh-see-see-oh-nes). 



Unless, 

Until, 

Very, 

Well, 

When, 

Where ? 

Why? 

With, 

Without, 

Here, 

There, 

Above, 

Below, 

On, 

Before, 

Behind, 

According to, 

Again, 

Against, 



A menos que, 

Hasta, 

Muy, mucho, 

Bien, 

Cuando, 

I Donde ? 

I Porque ? 

Con, 

Si, 

Aqu'i, 

Alii, 

Arriba, 

Abajo, 

Sol>re, 

Delante, 

Detras, 

Segun, 

Otra vez t 

Contra, 

178 



Ah meh-nohss keh. 

Ahss-tah. 

Moo-ee, moo-choh. 

Bee-en. 

Kwahn-doh. 

Don-deh. 

Pohr-keh. 

Kohn. 

Seen. 

Ah-kee'. 

Ahl-yee'. 

Ahr-ree-vah. 

Ah-bah-hoh. 

Soh-breh. 

Deh-lahn-teh. 

Deh-trass. 

Seh-goon. 

Oh-trah vess. 

Kon-trah. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 

All, 

Almost, 

Already, 

Also, 

Always, 

Among, 

And, 

As, 

As many, 

As much, 

At, 

At last, 

At least, 

Now, 

Because, 

Better, 

Between, 

Beyond, 

But, 

By, 

During, 

Early, 

Enough, 

Far, 

From, 

Here, 

How, 

However, 

If, 

In future, 

In, 
Inside, 



Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Todo, 


Toh-doh. 


Cast, 


Kah-see. 


Ya, 


Yah. 


Tatnbien, 


Tahm-bee-en. 


Sicmpre, 


See-em-preh. 


Entre, 


En-treh. 


Y, 


Ee. 


Como, 


Como. 


Tantos, 


Tahn-tohs. 


Tan to, 


Tahn-toh. 


A, en, 


Ah, en. 


Al fin, 


Ahl feen. 


A lo menos, 


Ah lo meh-nohs. 


Ahora, 


Ah-owr-ah. 


Porque, 


Pohr-keh. 


Mejor, 


Meh-hore. 


Entre, 


En-treh. 


Mas alia, 


Mas al-yah'. 


Pero, 


Peh-roh. 


Por, 


Pohr. 


Mien tr as, 


Mee-en-trahs. 


Temprano, 


Tem-prah-noh. 


Bastante, 


Bahs-tan-teh. 


Lejos, 


Leh-hos. 


De, desde, 


Deh des-deh. 


Aqui, 


Ah-kee'. ( 


Como, 


Koh-moh. 


No obstante, 


Noh obstan-teh. 


Si, 


See. 


En lo venidero, 


En loh veh-nee-deh- 




roh. 


En, dentro, 


En, den-troh. 


Adentro, 


Ah-den-troh. 


179 





GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



English. 


Argentine. 


Pronunciation. 


Late. 


Tanfe, 


Tahrdeh. 


Less, 


Afenos, 


Meh-nohs. 


Little, 


roco, 


Poh-koh. 


More, 


Mas, 


Mahs. 


Much, 


Afucho, 


Moo-choh. 


Nearly, 


Cast, 


Cah-see. 


Never, 


Nunfa, 


Noon-kah. 


Nothing, 


Nada, 


Nah-dah. 


Nowhere, 


NingMtM parte, 


Neen-gooh-nah pahr 






teh. 


Of, 


De, 


Deh. 


Often, 


A menudo, 


Ah meh noo doh. 


Only, 


Solamente, 


Sol-lah-men-teh. 


Opposite, 


En f rente, 


En frehn-teh. 


Or, 


o, 


Oh. 


Out of, 


Fuera de, 


l-'oo-er-ah deh. 


Perhaps, 


Quizas, 


Keesz-ass. 


Quick, 


Pronto, 


Pron-toh. 


The same, 


Lo mismo, 


Loh-mees-moh. 


Seldom, 


Kara vez 


Rah-rah vess. 


Since, 


Dcsde, 


Dehs-deh. 


Something, 


Algo, 


Ahl-goh. 


Sometimes, 


Algunas I'eees, 


Ahl-goo-nahs vess-es. 


So much, 


Tanto, 


Tahn-toh. 


Therefore, 


Por esc, 


1'ohr ess-oh. 


[To, 


A, 


Ah. 


1'ogether, 


Juntos, 


Hoon-tohs. 


Too much, 


Demasiado, 


1 )eh-mah-see-ah-doh. 


Towards, 


Hiicia, 


Ah'-see-ah. 



GUIDE TO BUENOS AIRES. 



NOTE BY THE COMPILER. 

Before writing Finis to the first edition of MitchelTs 
Standard Guide Book to Buenos Aires I feel it my duty to 
here express my sincere thanks for the courtesy shown by 
H. B. M. Consul, various Government Officials, the 
secretaries and other members of the Committees of some 
of the Clubs and Institutions mentioned, and many private 
individuals to whom I am indebted for guidance and 
information. 

In anticipation, also, I thank readers for their tolerance 
by not too severely criticising where adverse criticism may 
be justifiable, for it should be borne in mind that the 
inevitable obstacles always encountered by a pioneer effort 
have not been absent in the present case. 

Should this litttle work fill its unambitious mission, fresh 
editions, brought thoroughly up to date, will be issued yearly, 
and such being the case, I should feel more than grateful 
for any advice or suggestion that will, on future occasions, 
enable me to give greater satisfaction. 

THE COMPILER, 



I' ' 



lamas 



) & SONS, 
'lampton. 

BRITISH 
/IBS. 




/Jrr 



C. CURUTCHET. 

RIYADAYIA, 826. 

AVENIDA DE MAYO, 829, 

BUENOS AIRES. 



182 




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